Tatting Butterfly Pattern Instructions 1916 Corticelli Booklet

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Beautiful Tatting Butterfly Pattern

If you’ve followed this blog for any time at all, you’ll know I love butterflies. Put “butterfly” in the search box and more than 10 different posts will come up.

Today’s freebie is a tatting butterfly pattern from a 1916 Corticelli pattern booklet.

Corticelli Lessons in Tatting Butterfly Pattern

Along with the instructions for tatting the butterfly, I’ve included several snippets from the booklet. Such as Abbreviations and Actual Sizes for the Corticelli Mercerized Cordonnet thread as-well-as a description of the thread from an Ad that will help you decide on a substitute.

Instructions for Tatting the Butterfly

First, here are the original instructions:

Corticelli Lessons in Tatting ButterflyCorticelli Lessons in Tatting Butterfly Medallion

How to Download: Right-Click the photo and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it, it will open in another window and there you can save or print.

Instructions Re-written

I found this exact same butterfly pattern on web.archive.org with re-written instructions that may be easier to follow. From what I understand the web archive brings up web pages from years ago using the Internet Wayback Machine Archive. It’s a San Francisco–based nonprofit digital library with the stated mission of “universal access to all knowledge.”

DAINTY TATTED BUTTERFLYSecond and equally important are the additional snippets from the booklet that will help you with the instructions and type of thread to use.

Tatting Abbreviations and Thread Sizes

Corticelli Lessons in Tatting Butterfly Medallion Pattern AbbreviationsFrom what I understand the web archive brings up web pages from years ago using the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.

 

And last but not least are the Thread Descriptions.

Corticelli Thread Descriptions

corticelli princess pearl crochet cotton

Corticelli Mercerized CordonnetCorticelli Mercerized Cordonnet Ad

 

This is just one of many beautiful tatted butterfly patterns. As you can see from the graphic below, Pinterest has more examples than ever.

Pinterest Tatting Butterfly

For information on tatting and more patterns, put “tatting” into the search box in the top right column or check out the Related Posts below.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Armenian Edging Stitch Instructions from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine

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The article on the Armenian Edging Stitch in the 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine is titled One Makes This Lace With a Sewing Needle. There are instructions for three different designs. All of them start with a loop stitch across the material. Then by adding additional stitches you can build a pretty lace edge.

 

Armenian Edging Stitch Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle - Vintage Crafts and More

The instructions use a very fine crochet cotton to sew the edgings. A size 50 or 60 in white. Crochet cotton thread is sized by weight with each weight identified by a number. The lower the size number the thicker it is. The higher the crochet cotton’s weight number the finer the thread. So a Size 3 is heavier than a Size 10.

Armenian Edge Stitch - Vintage Crafts and More

Let’s Learn the Armenian Edging Stitch

Now you could try your hand at making an Armenian Edge Stitch following the directions above or I’ve found several blog tutorials and a YouTube video series that will help you master this stitch.

First of all, on the Artyfibres blog Sarah Whittle demonstrates stitches with step-by-step pictured tutorials. In her Stitch A-Z group she has a tutorial on the Armenian Edging Stitch. It’s very easy to follow as each pictured step has a number for your needle to follow.

Another well done tutorial is on the embroidery blog Kimberly Ouimet. She calls the Armenian Edge Stitch a Knot Stitch Edging and states that it is also known as Antwerp Stitch Edging.

Either way, it’s a good tutorial on this edging stitch. Her stitch looks very similar to a Blanket Stitch since she goes a little higher on the edge of the material. But again a very good tutorial with many pictures to break down each step in the stitch.

Last but not least is The Henry Art Gallery Embroidery Stitch Identification Guide.  There’s a diagram of the Armenian Edge Stitch as-well-as an Antwerp Edge. If you need to find a stitch this is a great site because all you have to do is click on the alphabetical Index of stitches.

The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work

This YouTube series has 8 parts on How to do Needle Lace, The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work. It’s really beautiful and it helps to see someone actually doing it.

In the comments the instructor, Ashley says there are very few if any books or patterns for this type of lace. She hopes that by doing these videos she encourages people to learn so there will be a renewed interest in this craft. If the comments on the videos are any indication, I’d say she is succeeding.

Scanned One Page PDF File

Armenian Edging Stitch – Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Tatted Medallion Pattern Snowflake Ornament and 1920’s Dress Design

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

tatted-medallion-pattern-vintage-crafts-and-more

 

This tatting pattern is from an article in The American Needlewoman magazine dated April 1924.

The medallion has four rings in the center and eight all around with picots on the outside edge. To me this could easily be a snowflake ornament once stiffened.

 

 

 

Here’s the scanned page of instructions:

tatted-medallion-snowflake-pattern-vintage-crafts-and-more

To Download the Pattern Page: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you do decide to use this tatting pattern as a snowflake ornament, be sure to read this post on how to stiffen crocheted items, Decorate for Thanksgiving with a Horn of Plenty Crochet Pattern.

On the other side of the page of tatting instructions was an advertisement for mail order sewing patterns. These illustrations give you a glimpse into dress designs in 1924. The descriptions of the dresses are just as interesting and the patterns were only 12¢ each!

The American Needlewoman Magazine Pattern Page - Vintage Crafts and More

The American Needlewoman Magazine Pattern Page Descriptions - Vintage Crafts and More


If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns. Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Edge in Petal or Cluny Tatting – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

 

 


Have you ever seen a beautiful piece of Cluny lace?

Cluny lace has long pointed tallies called wheat ears and is a geometric style of bobbin lace.

 

 

 

With today’s freebie you can get the same look without twisting lengths of thread on a bobbin. Instead there’s a technique called Petal or Cluny Tatting that can give you the same effect.

 

Petal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

 

The work is done with a shuttle and ball. It’s not easy, but by taking a look at the tutorial links below and practice, you can probably come up with a pretty Petal Tatting edge.

 

Petal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern Illustration 1 - Vintage Crafts and MorePetal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern Illustration 2 - Vintage Crafts and More

There are many places on the internet with tutorials on Petal or Cluny tatting. Here are a few:

Tatting a Cluny Leaf A YouTube video by tatmantats

Tatting Cluny Leaves by Hand A Needle Tatter’s Version

Hanging Cluny Leaf Flower Pattern and process by Tim TenClay

Also, in my research on Cluny Tatting, I found a super website by Georgia Seitz aka AKTATTER called Hanging the Cluny. She has a great page of information and links for making this pretty lace.

Here’s the pattern included in Aunt Ellen’s How-To Book on Needlework published in 1954.

Petal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

To print the pattern  or any other photo on the post, click on it, it will open in a new window, go to file, print and you’ll have a printed copy of the page.

Also at the bottom of the post there is a green Print Friendly button that will give you several options to print and save.

Find more about Tatting and how to do it in this previous post, Tatting Instructions.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.