A Godey’s Lady’s Book Star Design For Quilting

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Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine

Today’s quilting pattern comes from a Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine published in America in the 19th century for women. Below is one of the beautiful fashion plates included in these books.

Godey's Lady's Book Fashion Plate 1859

A Lady’s Book

In 1830 when Louis A. Godey first published this women’s magazine it was titled simply Lady’s Book. Around 1840 he added Godey’s to the title. Publishing stopped in 1898 and was taken over by another magazine The Puritan, A Journal For Gentlewomen.

Among one of the first and most successful editors of an American women’s magazine was Sarah Josepha Hale (link to a short biography of her on Encyclopedia Britannica).  She began editing Godey’s Lady’s Book after 1837. During that time until 1860 the circulation went from 70,000 to nearly 150,000 copies every month.

Godey’s left politics out of his magazine. Each monthly issue was filled with short stories, recipes, patterns, illustrations and what it’s best known for, the lovely hand-colored fashion plates.

The Complete Page

As an example I’ve included the entire page the star design came from. I’m not sure when in the 1800’s this design was published there was no date on this loose page.

Godey's Lady's Book - Vintage Crafts and More

Looking for Full Issues to Download

The Hathi Trust Digital Library has a Catalog Record of full scanned editions of the Godey’s Lady’s Magazine from Libraries and Universities. Click on any issue and a full scanned e-book will display. In the column to the left of the display page is several options. One of them is “Get this Book” with the option to download a page or the complete issue as a PDF.

On the right side of the display are options to see one page at a time, scroll or flip through the pages, thumbnails of all the pages and more. Put a couple hours aside, because once you start looking around it’s hard to stop.

Design For Quilting

Not only can this design be used for quilting but coloring, embroidery and applique come to mind. Use your photo editing software or printer to resize the image.

Godey's Lady's Book Design for Quilting - Vintage Crafts and More

Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save image as” depending on what browser you are using. Also you can click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save the image.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

A Lesson on Hemstitching Drawn Thread Needlework

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Hemstitching

It’s a popular type of ornamental needlework where you arrange and group threads in different ways. Hemstitching is a type of openwork, the warp of threads are drawn from the fabric and then drawn together by various stitches that form open patterns.

 

A Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

 

By grouping and sewing the threads in different stitches you can make up many combinations of design. Hemstitching can be the sole decoration on the piece or can be combined with other types of embroidery.

For simple hemstitching, draw out threads above the edge of a hem that has been basted in to any desired width.

Then with a needle and thread cross and group the threads making decorative clusters.

 

 

Mexican Drawn Thread Work

This hemstitching is similar to Mexican Drawn Thread Work. Previously, I wrote a post on that. Find it here: Mexican Thread Drawn Work Instructions and Patterns

 

Lesson on Hemstitching

Lesson on Hemstitching

 

PDF file to download below

This is a two page PDF file of the pages above that explains what hemstitching is and has instructions and illustrations for doing drawn thread work.

Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

A Scholehouse For The Needle Book Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

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embroidery-sprigs-bug-vintage-crafts-and-moreThe embroidery sprigs found on this blog post are from the pattern book A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker published in 1632, but I found these examples in a book titled Embroidery edited by Mrs. Archibald H. Christie and published in 1909.

 

Embroidery Book

It is “A collection of articles on subjects connected with the study of fine needlework, including stitches, materials, methods of work, and designing, and history, with numerous illustrations and coloured plates of modern work.

Here are more embroidery books written and edited by Mrs. Grace Christie.

 

The book I used I found on Archive.org. You can choose from several different download options. I usually download the PDF file. It’s easy and fast, just remember where you save it so you can find it later. Most of the time I save mine to the desktop, then I move them to the proper file. Here’s the link:  Embroidery.

Samplers and Pattern Books

When you study collections of samplers from a long time ago, you’ll notice that they often have certain details in common. Such as a little cross stitch bird, baskets of fruit and flowers, borders and floral sprigs. That leads us to believe that the needleworkers of that time may have chosen elements for their designs from the same book of patterns.

Few of these pattern books survived in comparison to the great many that once existed, but it’s not surprising, since they were greatly used, often pricked through the print of the pattern and pounced through perforations onto the material. This way of making tracings, and sometimes pages being ripped out, most certainly hurt the books, making editions very hard to find.

History of Lace

For more information on old pattern books, Mrs. Bury Palliser’s History of Lace has an appendix with a long list of them with descriptive notes. You can find this book and many others at Archive.org.

There is a copy published in 1865 and also one that was published ten years later in 1875.  They are in several languages and cover the period of 1527 to 1784. Many of them concern lace, but some of the books have designs specially arranged for embroidery.

If you’d like a hard copy of History of Lace by Mrs. Bury Palliser, Dover Publishing has a reproduced copy available on Amazon. I did find a couple originals for sale, but they were $94 and up.

A Scholehouse For The Needle

One English book, which has special interest for embroiderers is A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker printed in London in 1632. It’s a teaching book with patterns and examples with an emphasis on arranging your own designs.

For this reason even today this book is beneficial but hard to find. Doing a search for it, all I found were reproduced copies. Some of them costing hundreds of dollars. I didn’t see any originals available. One reproduced book on Etsy was $32 and ships from the United Kingdom.

I found several images of individual book pages available here and there on the internet when I did a Google search for them.

Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

It’s interesting to see examples of seventeenth-century patterns. The sprigs are in rows in the book. You’ll find many similar designs on the embroidered clothing of that time period.

 

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs and Bug

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs

 

In addition to using the patterns individually, you can build up the designs by arranging them in groups.

Here’s an Example

A Scholehouse for the Needle embroidery sprigs design

The figure to the right used the rose like spray, second to last on the first row of designs, its repeated four times. The main stem radiating outward. You’ll find the detached sprig in the second row of designs at the end.

A frame surrounds it and shows how a design can develop into something new.

 

 

 

To print or save the images, click on them, they will open in a new window and there you can save or print them.

In addition to saving or printing them from this post, I’ve made a one sheet PDF file you can download below:

Embroidery Designs From A Scholehouse For The Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.