A Godey’s Lady’s Book Star Design For Quilting

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Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine

Today’s quilting pattern comes from a Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine published in America in the 19th century for women. Below is one of the beautiful fashion plates included in these books.

Godey's Lady's Book Fashion Plate 1859

A Lady’s Book

In 1830 when Louis A. Godey first published this women’s magazine it was titled simply Lady’s Book. Around 1840 he added Godey’s to the title. Publishing stopped in 1898 and was taken over by another magazine The Puritan, A Journal For Gentlewomen.

Among one of the first and most successful editors of an American women’s magazine was Sarah Josepha Hale (link to a short biography of her on Encyclopedia Britannica).  She began editing Godey’s Lady’s Book after 1837. During that time until 1860 the circulation went from 70,000 to nearly 150,000 copies every month.

Godey’s left politics out of his magazine. Each monthly issue was filled with short stories, recipes, patterns, illustrations and what it’s best known for, the lovely hand-colored fashion plates.

The Complete Page

As an example I’ve included the entire page the star design came from. I’m not sure when in the 1800’s this design was published there was no date on this loose page.

Godey's Lady's Book - Vintage Crafts and More

Looking for Full Issues to Download

The Hathi Trust Digital Library has a Catalog Record of full scanned editions of the Godey’s Lady’s Magazine from Libraries and Universities. Click on any issue and a full scanned e-book will display. In the column to the left of the display page is several options. One of them is “Get this Book” with the option to download a page or the complete issue as a PDF.

On the right side of the display are options to see one page at a time, scroll or flip through the pages, thumbnails of all the pages and more. Put a couple hours aside, because once you start looking around it’s hard to stop.

Design For Quilting

Not only can this design be used for quilting but coloring, embroidery and applique come to mind. Use your photo editing software or printer to resize the image.

Godey's Lady's Book Design for Quilting - Vintage Crafts and More

Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save image as” depending on what browser you are using. Also you can click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save the image.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

The Secret Drawer Quilt Block Pattern

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Do you have a secret drawer?

Hidden compartments that hold old love letters, jewelry, coins and important papers. Check out this wonderful Wooten’s Patent King of Desks that you know must have a couple of secret drawers.

Wootens Patent Cabinet Office Secretary Desk

The Secret Drawer

That brings me to today’s freebie The Secret Drawer quilt pattern. A 12-inch square block that uses light and dark plain and patterned fabric. It’s very similar to the Spool Block.

The Secret Drawer Quilt Pattern

As a matter of fact, you can see the spools surrounding the patterned centers in the sample. Eveline Foland designed this pattern for a 1930 issue of the Kansas City Star newspaper.

The Secret Drawer Eveline Foland Quilt Pattern
Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Links to more Secret Drawers

The Early Women Masters website has a colorful diagram of the Secret Drawer quilt block pattern and a couple of paragraphs of information about it here: Antique Geometric Quilt Designs – Secret Drawer.

It is also one of many quilt blocks included in the Quilt Index dot Org website. They have the same image of the newspaper pattern I’ve shared. It’s a bit cleaner though, because it hasn’t been glued into a scrapbook.

Interesting….

Alias-Grace-Novel-Margaret-Atwood
One of the most interesting things I came across while researching this quilt block is the crime novel Alias Grace: A Novel by Margaret Atwood. In 1843, a 16-year-old housemaid named Grace Marks was found guilty for the murder of her employer and two others.

 

 

It was a sensational trial for the time and made headlines around the world. The story of Grace Marks is true, but the novel is fictional and depicts what might have happened during her incarceration. An added bonus is the novel will soon be a Netflix Original Series.

I haven’t read the book so I don’t know how it relates to the Secret Drawer quilt pattern, but I found a WordPress blog that goes by the name The Quilts of Alias Grace, A Canadian girl’s journey of stitching through Margaret Atwood’s fiction.

According to the author of this blog, the book has a lot about textiles. The writer named the chapters of the book after quilts and includes sketches. The doctors ask Grace questions about the patterns and their meanings of the quilts she’s working on. The book is about Grace, but in it she surrounds herself with quilts and fabric.

The author of the blog takes you along as she tackles the difficult piecing of the Secret Drawer block and a blog post titled Secret Drawer Has Stumped Me.

 

 

Vintage Block Quilt AlongCharise Creates Vintage Block Quilt Along

In a Vintage Block Quilt Along, Charise Creates One Stitch At A Time has a great tutorial for the quilt block you can follow along with. Craftsy has Charise Creates Secret Drawer block pattern download for free.

 

 

One Little Block Pattern

Well, I didn’t expect to find out all this information from one little pattern, but here it is. Have you read Alias Grace: A Novel? Have you sewn a Secret Drawer block? Let us know by visiting our Facebook Fan Page.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Nancy Cabot’s Poinsettia Applique Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

I hope those in the US had a wonderful Thanksgiving Day with family and friends.

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Applique Quilt Block

 

With today’s freebie we are going to jump right into Christmas with a Poinsettia Applique pattern from quilt designer Nancy Cabot that was first issued in the Chicago Tribune Newspaper in 1933.

 

 

 

 

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Quilt Pattern Chicago Tribune 1933

 

I found the actual clipping from the newspaper archives online.

It’s not very readable, but gives you an idea of what this quilt block pattern looked like in it’s original form.

You can find a bit of history about Nancy Cabot Newspaper Quilt Patterns in this article on the Illinois Quilt History site.

Another great site about these Nancy Cabot (her real name was Loretta Leitner Rising) patterns is on Early Women Masters dot Net which has an index of her quilt designs.

I’ve recreated the full size pattern with instructions. This is an ambitious project to finish for an experienced quilter.

With the many pieces to cut out to make the applique block, using fusible web would probably be the best way to do it.

This Thermoweb 17-Inch by 5-Yard Heat’n Bond Ultra Hold Iron-On Adhesive is a best seller on Amazon, but there are many others to choose from.

 

 

 

You’ll find several different poinsettia quilt block patterns by Nancy Cabot in this book — Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Applique.  Also in it is a very similar poinsettia applique block by Grandmother Clark.

Here is the page of pattern pieces. Remember there is no sewing allowance included so the quarter-inch seam allowance will need to be added when cutting them out.

 

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Applique Quilt Pattern

The one page pattern is in PDF file format below:

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Applique Quilt Block PDF

To read the PDF file you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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1930s Depression Era Merry-Go-Round Scrap Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Who doesn’t love a Merry-Go-Round……..

merry go round quilt patternI found another great quilt pattern in my 1930’s quilting scrapbook called The Merry-Go-Round. This one was published in the Kansas City Star by McKim Studios in 1930. This 1930’s quilt pattern illustrates perfectly how the quilts of the depression era used “odd scraps” of fabric.

merry-go-round-quilt-block-vintage-crafts-and-more

Ruby McKim admonishes the maker that “each block can be a different color so long as the light and dark value remains the same.” So even when you’re using scraps from feedsacks, etc. pay attention to the color values of the fabrics.

The Merry-Go-Round is actually four blocks, all exactly alike, turned in different directions.

 

merry-go-round-quilt-block-templates-vintage-crafts-and-more

This particular Merry-Go-Round quilt pattern is different from many I found when searching the internet. Most used a hexagon pattern, the difference is this one uses half-square triangles.

Craftsy has a blog post that shows you How to Make 8 Half-Square Triangles at Once: The Magic 8 Method. This method would certainly speed up the making of this quilt.

Here’s another good tutorial on creating half-square triangles faster and easier at the Diary of a Quilter blog, Half-square-triangle short-cuts and easy square-up.

In this YouTube video by Jenny Doan of the Missouri Quilt Company she demonstrates a modern and easy way to sew a Merry-Go-Round Quilt.

For more information on quilt designer Ruby McKim, another of her patterns and more links on sewing half-square triangles, check out this previous blog post, Summer is Sailing Away – Sail Boat Quilt Block.

To print or save this pattern, right click on it, it will open in another window and there you can print or save it using your computer’s browser. There is also a green Print Friendly button at the bottom of the post.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Embroidery and Applique Design with Flowers and Hearts

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

This is a pretty design that can be used for Embroidery or Applique.

Embroidery and Applique Design - Vitnage Crafts and MoreThe design has instructions included to use the design as an applique or embroidery stitches to complete the design. See this post for an explanation and how-to on embroidery stitches.

Embroidery and Applique Design Instructions - Vitnage Crafts and More

By right clicking on either of the images above you can choose to “Save Link As” or “Save Image As” depending on the browser you use, to save it for later or click on the image, it will open in a new window to print or save.

If you’re interested in how to do applique this book shows you how to create flawless appliqué in just minutes—by hand or machine.

 

 

 

To learn more about embroidery, this book is a comprehensive guide with step-by-step instructions of stitches and how to use them.

 

 

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Quilting Flower Design that can be used for Quilts, Embroidery or a Coloring Page

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Today I’m sharing a beautiful floral quilting design cut from a newspaper that can be used for embroidery or a coloring page as well. Done by Eveline Foland, it’s not dated but most likely from the 1930’s.

This design is beautiful in quilting, either for silk cushions or as a quilting design for the plain blocks of a pieced or appliqued quilt. If it is too large for your blocks omit a leaf or blossom.  It may be repeated and quilted into a border. When used for silk cushion it is distinctive. Any quilt fan will find many ways to use the design. Just a hint is enough.

Floral Quilting or Embroidery Design Vintage Crafts and More
To save this design, simply click on the image above. It will open in a new window and there you can use the right click menu to “save image as” or print using your computer’s options. You can also use the green print friendly button at the bottom of this post.


If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Dutch Tulip Quilt Pattern from the 1930’s

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

It seems like I’ve been on a flower theme the last few weeks. Maybe because it’s almost Spring and I’m starting to see pretty blooms here and there in my town. Besides vintage patterns, I love gardening, and have been planning my flower beds for this year. I don’t dare go in a nursery until I have an idea of what I’m going to plant or the sky’s the limit once I get in there!

 

Today I’m sharing a pretty Dutch Tulip quilt pattern from 1931. Designed by Eveline Foland and published in the Kansas City Star Newspaper.

Dutch Tulip Newspaper Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

It is an applique quilt block using red, green and gold. Part of the instructions were cut off when it was added to a scrap book so I will try to repeat them here and fill in the blanks.

The glorious season of tulips that has just passed in Kansas City should suggest any number of lovely color combinations for this conventionalized applique design.  The pattern may be developed i many different colors and the narrow circle can either be appliqued or embroidered in a simple “chain” or “stem” stitch, using a rather heavy green thread. Cut a plain white block nine inches square for the background. Allow for narrow seams.

I’ve shared several other Kansas City Star Newspaper quilt patterns through the years. Check the Related Posts below or do a search for quilt patterns in the search box at the top of this blog.

Dutch Tulip Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

To save or print this pattern, click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can use your browser to save or print. Also there is a Print Friendly green button below the post.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns. Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

1930s Magnolia Bud Kansas City Star Quilt Pattern

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One thing I love about living in the South in America is the beautiful Magnolia trees. Their big, glossy green leaves and the wonderful large, white and pink flowers when they’re full and open are something to behold.

Magnolia Bud - Vintage Crafts and More

Today’s freebie is a Magnolia Bud quilt pattern from the 1930’s. The designer is Eveline Foland who created many quilt patterns for the Kansas City Star Newspaper.

 

Magnolia Bud Eveline Foland Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

 

There are many variations of the Magnolia Bud, but Eveline calls this one a conventional version. She suggests using rose and pink on a light background. The blocks are set diagonally and may be alternated with a plain block in the quilt.

Remember to allow for seams when cutting out your templates for this pattern. Normally a quarter inch.

To use the pattern, simply click on it to open in another window, then save or print.

If you’re interested in 1930’s era quilts, Martingale’s Stitch This! website has an article on 1930’s Quilts for Today’s Quilters which has examples of several different quilt patterns used during that time period.

You might also like to take a look at this book available on Amazon: The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them, which not only includes 1930’s quilt blocks but letters from Farm Women during that time.

Enjoy!

 

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Using Tessellations as a Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

The definition of tessellations can become very technical and mathematical (see Tessellation on Wikipedia, wow!) , but for my purposes, I’m keeping it simple.

A tessellation is a shape used over and over again to form a pattern without any gaps and no overlapping. Another way of explaining tessellation is tiling.

Tessellations Martin Isaac Tile PatternsTile Patterns © Photographer: Martin Isaac

Actually, many quilt patterns are tessellations. Fitting fabric together like a puzzle, not overlapping and no gaps. Eveline Foland used an hour glass shape as a tessellation in her Friendship Quilt from 1930.

She explains that this is a very old, quaint pattern, easy to piece and works up quickly. It’s called a friendship quilt because you ask your friends for pieces from the their favorite sewn dresses or pretty children’s prints.

A straight edge can be achieved by cutting the pieces in half. But the curved edge is pretty and can be bound with a colored braid.

 

Tessellations Quilt Pattern Hour Glass  - Vintage Crafts and More

By fitting the fabric pieces together, in this example each piece of fabric is different, you begin to form your quilt.

On Susan Dague Quilts website, she refers to them as Solving the Puzzles. She has several great examples of using tessellations in quilts.

Marti Mitchell, a well-known quilt teacher, has a Multi-Size Tessellating Windmill Tool that is a clear acrylic template with markings for eight different sizes. There’s a 15 minute video quilting tutorial, Tessellating Windmills and Leap Frog Method on her website explaining how to use it. Plus she offers a PDF hand out for the pattern.

The American Quilter’s Society website has a free pattern for Jery Auty’s Tessellating Hearts Quilt.

Here’s the full page for the 1930’s Friendship Quilt pattern:

Tessellations Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Just click on the image to print or use the green Print Friendly button below the post.

Enjoy!

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Tulip Pattern for Garden Bouquet Quilt – VTNS Fan Freebie Friday

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

This is a newspaper clipping from my 1930’s quilt scrap book. A Tulip, the first flower published for the Garden Bouquet Quilt, a series of patterns published every Sunday in the early 1930’s.

The name of the newspaper has been cut off so I’m not sure what paper it’s from, many papers included this quilt pattern series.

 

Tulip Pattern for Garden Bouquet Quilt Applique - Vintage Crafts and More

These were part of the Nancy Page Quilt Club and were printed full size for piecing and applique. Nancy Page was a byline for quilt pattern features by Florence La Ganke Harris. The quilt series started with an illustration of a woman holding up a finished Garden Bouquet quilt.

The first pattern was the urn. The Quilt Index website has a newspaper clipping of the urn pattern pieces.

The Tulip was the second pattern and the next two were the meek and the saucy bird. I found a clipping from the Ottawa Citizen newspaper of the Saucy Bird on the Google News website. Scroll up the page to see it.

Tulip Pattern for Garden Bouquet Quilt Block - Vintage Crafts and More

Each quilt block had an urn with the two birds on it and a different flower in the middle. There were a total of 20 blocks and if you missed a pattern, you could order one for 5 cents.

Some of the flowers included: tulip, crocus, pansy, lily of the valley, cactus, wild rose, trillium, canterbury, violet, poppy, bellflower, phlox, nasturtium. The Tulip is the first of twenty flowers that made up the Garden Bouquet.

Tulip Pattern for Garden Bouquet Quilt - Vintage Crafts and More

Quilt History: Layer by Layer has a really good write up and photo samples of original Garden Bouquet Quilt blocks.

You’ll find the full size newspaper clipping in the file below:

Tulip Pattern for Garden Bouquet Quilt

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here. There are also free Adobe Reader Apps for mobile devices.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you have any quilting you’ve done that you’d like to share, please be sure to stop by the Facebook VTNS Fanpage, we’d love to see your work.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.