The Secret Drawer Quilt Block Pattern

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Do you have a secret drawer?

Hidden compartments that hold old love letters, jewelry, coins and important papers. Check out this wonderful Wooten’s Patent King of Desks that you know must have a couple of secret drawers.

Wootens Patent Cabinet Office Secretary Desk

The Secret Drawer

That brings me to today’s freebie The Secret Drawer quilt pattern. A 12-inch square block that uses light and dark plain and patterned fabric. It’s very similar to the Spool Block.

The Secret Drawer Quilt Pattern

As a matter of fact, you can see the spools surrounding the patterned centers in the sample. Eveline Foland designed this pattern for a 1930 issue of the Kansas City Star newspaper.

The Secret Drawer Eveline Foland Quilt Pattern
Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Links to more Secret Drawers

The Early Women Masters website has a colorful diagram of the Secret Drawer quilt block pattern and a couple of paragraphs of information about it here: Antique Geometric Quilt Designs – Secret Drawer.

It is also one of many quilt blocks included in the Quilt Index dot Org website. They have the same image of the newspaper pattern I’ve shared. It’s a bit cleaner though, because it hasn’t been glued into a scrapbook.

Interesting….

Alias-Grace-Novel-Margaret-Atwood
One of the most interesting things I came across while researching this quilt block is the crime novel Alias Grace: A Novel by Margaret Atwood. In 1843, a 16-year-old housemaid named Grace Marks was found guilty for the murder of her employer and two others.

 

 

It was a sensational trial for the time and made headlines around the world. The story of Grace Marks is true, but the novel is fictional and depicts what might have happened during her incarceration. An added bonus is the novel will soon be a Netflix Original Series.

I haven’t read the book so I don’t know how it relates to the Secret Drawer quilt pattern, but I found a WordPress blog that goes by the name The Quilts of Alias Grace, A Canadian girl’s journey of stitching through Margaret Atwood’s fiction.

According to the author of this blog, the book has a lot about textiles. The writer named the chapters of the book after quilts and includes sketches. The doctors ask Grace questions about the patterns and their meanings of the quilts she’s working on. The book is about Grace, but in it she surrounds herself with quilts and fabric.

The author of the blog takes you along as she tackles the difficult piecing of the Secret Drawer block and a blog post titled Secret Drawer Has Stumped Me.

 

 

Vintage Block Quilt AlongCharise Creates Vintage Block Quilt Along

In a Vintage Block Quilt Along, Charise Creates One Stitch At A Time has a great tutorial for the quilt block you can follow along with. Craftsy has Charise Creates Secret Drawer block pattern download for free.

 

 

One Little Block Pattern

Well, I didn’t expect to find out all this information from one little pattern, but here it is. Have you read Alias Grace: A Novel? Have you sewn a Secret Drawer block? Let us know by visiting our Facebook Fan Page.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Nancy Cabot’s Poinsettia Applique Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

I hope those in the US had a wonderful Thanksgiving Day with family and friends.

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Applique Quilt Block

 

With today’s freebie we are going to jump right into Christmas with a Poinsettia Applique pattern from quilt designer Nancy Cabot that was first issued in the Chicago Tribune Newspaper in 1933.

 

 

 

 

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Quilt Pattern Chicago Tribune 1933

 

I found the actual clipping from the newspaper archives online.

It’s not very readable, but gives you an idea of what this quilt block pattern looked like in it’s original form.

You can find a bit of history about Nancy Cabot Newspaper Quilt Patterns in this article on the Illinois Quilt History site.

Another great site about these Nancy Cabot (her real name was Loretta Leitner Rising) patterns is on Early Women Masters dot Net which has an index of her quilt designs.

I’ve recreated the full size pattern with instructions. This is an ambitious project to finish for an experienced quilter.

With the many pieces to cut out to make the applique block, using fusible web would probably be the best way to do it.

This Thermoweb 17-Inch by 5-Yard Heat’n Bond Ultra Hold Iron-On Adhesive is a best seller on Amazon, but there are many others to choose from.

 

 

 

You’ll find several different poinsettia quilt block patterns by Nancy Cabot in this book — Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Applique.  Also in it is a very similar poinsettia applique block by Grandmother Clark.

Here is the page of pattern pieces. Remember there is no sewing allowance included so the quarter-inch seam allowance will need to be added when cutting them out.

 

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Applique Quilt Pattern

The one page pattern is in PDF file format below:

Nancy Cabot Poinsettia Applique Quilt Block PDF

To read the PDF file you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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1930s Depression Era Merry-Go-Round Scrap Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Who doesn’t love a Merry-Go-Round……..

merry go round quilt patternI found another great quilt pattern in my 1930’s quilting scrapbook called The Merry-Go-Round. This one was published in the Kansas City Star by McKim Studios in 1930. This 1930’s quilt pattern illustrates perfectly how the quilts of the depression era used “odd scraps” of fabric.

merry-go-round-quilt-block-vintage-crafts-and-more

Ruby McKim admonishes the maker that “each block can be a different color so long as the light and dark value remains the same.” So even when you’re using scraps from feedsacks, etc. pay attention to the color values of the fabrics.

The Merry-Go-Round is actually four blocks, all exactly alike, turned in different directions.

 

merry-go-round-quilt-block-templates-vintage-crafts-and-more

This particular Merry-Go-Round quilt pattern is different from many I found when searching the internet. Most used a hexagon pattern, the difference is this one uses half-square triangles.

Craftsy has a blog post that shows you How to Make 8 Half-Square Triangles at Once: The Magic 8 Method. This method would certainly speed up the making of this quilt.

Here’s another good tutorial on creating half-square triangles faster and easier at the Diary of a Quilter blog, Half-square-triangle short-cuts and easy square-up.

In this YouTube video by Jenny Doan of the Missouri Quilt Company she demonstrates a modern and easy way to sew a Merry-Go-Round Quilt.

For more information on quilt designer Ruby McKim, another of her patterns and more links on sewing half-square triangles, check out this previous blog post, Summer is Sailing Away – Sail Boat Quilt Block.

To print or save this pattern, right click on it, it will open in another window and there you can print or save it using your computer’s browser. There is also a green Print Friendly button at the bottom of the post.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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