1925 Star Needlework Journal Vintage Tea Apron Sewing Instructions

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A Vintage Tea Apron

Today’s vintage tea apron sewing pattern instructions are from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal magazine Volume 10 Number 1.  The American Thread Co. published the magazine quarterly. You could have a yearly subscription mailed to you for 40 cents or pay 10 cents for a single copy.

No Pattern, but Materials and Instructions

Actual pattern pieces are not included for this tea apron but instead there is a list of materials required and instructions for sewing. The photo is in black and white, but the true colors are yellow with a black lace trim. Very 1920’s.

A Tea Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

Embroidery Design

For embellishment an embroidery design is included. A simple but fun design to play with.

 

Apron embroidery design - Vintage Crafts and More

If you’d like to download the embroidery design, right click on the image to save it.

 

Just 3/4 yard of 36 inch yellow voile (soft, sheer fabric) material is used. 2¼ yards of black lace and 1¼ yards of ribbon for the tie.  The bottom of the apron has a curved shape. When complete the apron is 23 inches long and 27 inches wide. Try a stronger material or make it bigger, it could easily be done.

 

Apron Sewing Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

A three inch hem is sewn at the top and the sides are shirred (technique that takes a regular piece of fabric and shrinks it up, giving it elasticity) shape. Two strands of black embroidery thread and a small running stitch make up the straight lines on the apron.

Shirring Tips

The Craftsy blog has a Shirring Tips for Beginners post that has some good pointers and Seamingly Smitten has a tutorial on How to Shir Fabric with elastic thread.

Does anyone have some ideas about sewing this apron, changing the size or shirring fabric, please let us know in the comments below.

Link to a Garden Apron

I’ve featured another apron to sew in a previous post you can use to gather garden fruits and vegetables. It also doesn’t have a pattern, only sewing instructions with an illustration.

Here’s the one page PDF file for the 1925 Tea Apron:

Star Needlework Journal – Tea Apron

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!


This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

1800’s Child’s Pinafore Dress Sewing Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie will take us back to sewing in the 1800’s. Unlike the wonderful sewing patterns we have today, the patterns used in the 19th century were diagrams in magazines such as Peterson’s or Godey’s Ladies.

This is a dainty pinafore dress for a child. The material suggested to sew this pretty pinafore is Mull Muslin, Diaper or Holland.  Each of these is a thin plainwoven, opaque linen or cotton fabric. 

Childs Pinafore Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

The pattern pieces include back, front, side fronts, sleeve, shoulder and trimmings. Measurements are given in inches for each pattern piece. The dotted lines on the pattern pieces represent a fold. You’ll also notice letters and asterisks to match the pieces when sewing. The trimming is your choice and could be lace.

Antique Childs Pinafore Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

You’ll need to draw the pattern using the measurements noted. Probably on wrapping, freezer or shelf paper, taping portions together as necessary. The instructions below suggest using some old muslin rather than paper.

In a May 1877 Peterson’s Ladies Magazine volume an instruction on how to enlarge their diagrams was written. It’s assumed that most ladies of this day knew the fundamentals of sewing, but there must’ve been a few questions about copying the diagrams into a sewing pattern.

Enlarging our Diagrams - May 1877 Petersons Ladies Magazine

This explanation is included with the pattern in the PDF format file link below:

1800s Child’s Pinafore Sewing Pattern

To read a file in PDF format you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Free Basket Apron Pattern to Sew for use in your Home and Garden

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Vegetable and Fruit Basket Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

 

This apron is designed for double duty. It would be great for use around the house and outside in the garden.

 

Touted as “clothing suited to your job”, the easy to sew basket apron is from a 1944 US Department of Agriculture Farmer’s Bulletin ~ Dresses and Aprons for work in the home.

 

 

 

 

 

They go on to write, “A dress that restricts when you reach or bend, that twists or gets in your way when you stoop or climb may be as fatiguing as a poorly planned kitchen.”

Even in 2015 I think this apron would be a great help. More than once I’ve gone out to my garden, started picking veggies, and without a basket tried to balance everything in two hands, dropping many along the way back to the house.

They suggest using a sturdy cotton. I thought maybe even denim would work. You sew a casing for the drawstrings, they recommend shoe laces, and by gathering them on either side, you form a basket.

 

Basket Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

 

There isn’t a pattern with it, but from the illustrations you can see the basics of what you’d need. A large circle of material squared on either end, a waistband that ties in the back and a casing for the drawstring on the rounded edge of the apron.

 

 

How to Sew a Basket Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

To save or print the apron diagram, right click on it and then you can save it for printing. You can also use the Print Friendly button at the bottom of the post.

You can find a similar Harvest Apron Tutorial on The 104 Homestead site and another vintage garden apron in an earlier post on this site.

Here’s a link for a short and informative article about aprons from The Blade newspaper in Toledo, Ohio – Aprons are the fabric of history and home.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Bath Towel Apron Sewing Instructions

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Today I’m sharing sewing instructions for a Bath Towel Apron. Perfect for a hostess gift or new mom.

Bath Towel Apron Sewing Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More
You simply take an ordinary bath towel, 27″ x 42″, cut it according to the directions and sew strips (chintz was used in the example) on the unfinished edges of the towel.

Have fun with it! The color combinations for the towel and strips is endless.

Bath Towel Apron Sewing Instructions - Vintage Crafts and MoreBath Towel Apron Sewing Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

The link below is a PDF file to download for later:

Bath Towel Sewing Instructions

The pattern is in pdf format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

Smocked Gingham Fabric Pillow Instructions – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Welcome to VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie Friday!

I found this great little Coats and Clark give away sheet from 1962. It’s instructions on how to make Smocked Gingham Pillows.

Vintage Crafts and More - Smocked Gingham Pillow InstructionsThey have a pretty effect and are easy to do. You just smock the gingham fabric, assemble and stuff.

They aren’t meant to be slip covers. With no iron cottons and Dacron stuffing, you should be able to throw the entire pillow in the washing machine and have it come out good as new.

Use wash n’ wear gingham with 1 inch checks. It takes one yard of fabric for each pillow.

Vintage Crafts and More - Smocked Gingham Pillow Instructions 1

Just follow the easy directions and before you know it you’ll have pretty accents for your home.

Vintage Crafts and More - Smocked Gingham Pillow Instructions 2The complete instructions to smock and sew the pillows is in a 2 page PDF file you can download and keep for later:

Smocked Gingham Pillows Instructions

You’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer to view the file. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our VTNS Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Please share your favorite type of needlework, hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook

Enjoy!

Making a Child’s Robe from a Bath Towel – Easy Sewing Project

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Today’s Freebie is an easy sewing project, how to make a child’s robe from a bath towel. It comes from an article printed in a 1955 magazine titled Profitable Hobbies.  Hobbyists that had a good idea and could explain it clearly wrote the articles. Most had never written articles before and just wanted to share their experiences making some extra cash.

Even though the articles are from years ago, many of the ideas in them can still be applied today. There is a difference in the cost of materials and what you can earn from your item, but the basic instructions haven’t changed.

Towel to Robe

I have several of these magazines and this article caught my eye because it’s about sewing. To make the robes the author suggests buying new towels, but if you’re like me, you have several towels in very good condition around the house that could be re-purposed as a sweet robe for a child in the family. If you decide to sell them, say at a holiday bazaar, than it’s probably best to buy new.

This robe would be a great two for one. Use it as a beach towel after swimming and a robe in the hotel room. Less luggage on your summer vacation.

Robe from a Towel - Vintage Crafts and More

Read the Full Article below:

The full article is below along with a PDF file you can download for future reference if you’d like.

************************************************************

TERRY TOWELS have moved out of the bathroom into the sewing room. These softly textured cotton towels are easily converted into bath robes for the small fry.

I was intrigued by the idea after seeing my sister-in-law making robes from old bath towels for her children. Even when old material was used, the robes were so clever I could scarcely wait until next day to buy towels to try my hand at fashioning some of my own designs.

Selecting two towels, one a beautiful sun gold color, and the other white, with orchid stripes, I hastened home. In no time at all, and with little expense, I had made two very attractive robes.

To see them was to admire them, and many of my friends and neighbors in Plainview, Texas, asked that I make robes for them. Before realizing it, I was in the bath robe business. A big investment is not necessary but originality and neatness are essential.

Towels of three sizes can be made into robes for three age groups as follows:

  • Average towel, 20 x 40 inches, for age fifteen months to two years.
  • Large towel, 22 x 24 inches, for age three to four years.
  • Extra Large towels, 25 x 46 inches, for age four to five years.

Materials needed for finishing each robe are: 3½ to 4 yards of grosgrain ribbon, the same color as the robe it is to be used on, and matching thread. Robes bound in self-color ribbon have a more pleasing look than when contrasting colors are used.

A TOWEL robe can be made in a jiffy because the firmly woven selvage edges and hemmed ends cut the sewing time to a minimum. Only three steps are involved in converting a towel into a robe and are as follows:

First: Determine the correct measurement of the child by folding towel in center, with hemmed edges at the bottom; hold folded edge to shoulder, measure from shoulder to a few inches below the knee, which gives a short-length robe.

Second: In cutting, leave towel folded at center, then fold length-wise to cut the neckline and sleeves. Butterfly sleeves are formed by placing the scissors on the edge of towel at waistline, and cutting a few inches toward the small of back, then curving outward. Unfold towel and split through center to make front opening.

Third: Gather skirt sides even with waist; sew to slit in waist, then seam sides together. Bind front opening, sleeves, and neck with ribbon, leaving loose ends at neck long enough to tie. Stitch ribbon across the waistline gathers, leaving sufficient length for tie.

The terries, vat dyed and guaranteed colorfast, have made their debut into this modern age in exquisite rainbow colors. The lighter tones include such new shades as Malibou coral, Pacific blue, mint green, petal rose, sunshine yellow and heirloom white. While darker shades are. Victorian wine, spice brown, cherry red, charcoal grey and spruce green, in addition to the old favorite shades.

Robe Cutting Guide - Vintage Crafts and More

CUTTING GUIDE for towel robe. Dimensions will vary in accordance with size towel used, but all sizes are cut the same way. Inset shows a completed robe.

IN SELECTING towels, I keep in mind colors that will be most suitable for each child. I also watch for the novelty designs, as well as solid colors. The solids are always popular with both the boys and the girls. Many of the solids have border designs that stand out like lovely cameos against the velvety ground.

Robes for boys are attractive when made from the reversible patterns, like the “under-sea” motif of coral. Branches and sea horses. The broad-stripe towels with white background as gay as a carnival, definitely give that “he-man” look to the little boy.

For a little extra trim for a boy’s robe, applique a pair of animal. Figures near the neck, spacing evenly on each side of the front opening.

Robes for girls made from the jacquard patterns of flowers, scrolls and graceful swans are especially attractive. Embroidered borders on the solids give a dainty feminine touch.

After making several robes, one accumulates an assortment of scraps which can be made into artistic trims for the solid color robes. For example, a deep purple robe with a yellow rosette perched on the left shoulder of the “Little Miss” robe will give an exciting look.

Form a Rosette

To form rosette, merely cut a circle, about two inches in diameter, out of desired color and gather the edges. (The gathered side is used for the right side.) For leaves, cut tube-shape on the fold, sew and turn. Arrange leaves on the opposite side of rosette.

Once you let yourself go “artistically,” so to speak, there is no end to the designs and unusual color combinations that can be worked out.

Create your own patterns for animal designs, practice cutting patterns from paper until you get one that pleases you. If, however, you prefer, you can find many interesting pictures in magazines, from which you can get patterns for designs to use on robes.

A LOCAL needleshop sells my robes on a commission of twenty per cent of the retail price, but I sell more of them from my home.

Throughout the year people buy the robes for birthday gifts, but my best season is Christmas. I keep seasonal colors in stock. The dark shades sell better in the fall and winter, and the pastels in the summer months.

Remember This Was Written in 1955

The towels cost me an average of forty-nine cents, eighty-nine cents and $1.29, plus thirty-five cents for the ribbon for each robe. Since so little thread is used, I do not count the cost of it. Finished robes sell for $2, $2.49 and $2.98. The profit on each robe is small, but I make them in my spare time and find that items sell much better if one does not overcharge.

The robes invite hard usage by the preschool children, they are colorful, attractive, and no more trouble to wash than a towel, so are very practical and both mother and child adore them.

Written by Pauline H. Smith, Profitable Hobbies, December 1955

Downloadable PDF File

Tots Robe Article PDF

The article is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting Vintage Crafts and More.

Multi-Pocket Gardening Tool Apron to Sew

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Spring has sprung and I’m ready to get out in the garden. I know many of our members enjoy gardening and the lovely flowers in their yards. To lessen our garden labor, today we’re featuring a pattern for a garden apron.

That reminds me. I saw a cute saying on the ad board outside my  neighborhood garden center. It goes like this, “Spring has sprung and we’re so excited we wet our plants.”  A little corny, but I thought it was funny.

In an article from a 1922 Home Arts Magazine entitled Equipment to Lessen Garden Labor there is a pattern for an Apron for Tools. Besides having to do a little measuring, it’s very easy and will work for all sizes.

Vintage Crafts and More - Garden Tool Apron Sewing Pattern

ONE—HALF yard of cloth and 3 yards of tape for binding is sufficient material for this garment. Cut a pattern by dimensions given in the illustration. Bind the edges with tape. Use one piece 60 inches long for binding sides and bottom of apron.

Vintage Crafts and More - Garden Tool Apron Pattern

To fit the apron cut it out a little across the top, allowing center of the top to be curved downward about 2 inches lower than the top of the sides.  Place a half-inch dart 2 inches from the center on each side of the top. Taper these darts to a point 4 inches above the bottom of the pocket and stitch them in place.

Hem the ends of a piece of tape 36 inches long and bind the top of the apron, leaving an even length on each side for tying strings. Fold the pattern on the dotted line and stitch to form the pockets. The center pocket stitched in “V” shape will leave a slanting pocket on each side.

The handles of the tools carried in these pockets will not interfere with the arms at work.

If you do better with a step-by-step photo tutorial, you’ll find this tutorial for a similar Garden Apron on the Make it Do blog.

*** A comment was made about how to sew this apron. I realized in looking back over it, that a diagram that I included in the original post, shouldn’t have been there. It was for the Garden Kneeling Pad that was also shown in the article as you can see below. Sorry for the mix up.  I’ve made the correction. ***

Vintage Crafts and More - Garden Tool Apron Full Article

If you’re interested in more garden apron sewing patterns, check out these sites:

For our quilters out there, you know what a fat quarter is (1/4 yard cut of fabric that (usually) measures 18″ x 22″). This pattern from the Sew, Mama, Sew! blog uses fat quarters to make a cute garden apron.

Fat Quarter Project – Gardener’s Apron

This one from the TLC Home site uses applique.

Gardening Apron Quilted Clothing Pattern by Phyllis Dobbs.

This Fresh Spring Gardening Apron Pattern from Craftaholics Anonymous® is so pretty!

This is just a photo of a Garden Apron, but what a great idea. It uses the seat of an old pair of jeans, and the back pockets become garden tool holders.

Enjoy!

 

Mother’s Day Sewing Poem from a 1926 Needlecraft Magazine

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I’m sharing a sweet little Mother’s Day Poem about sewing. It was published in a 1926 Needlecraft Magazine. Let’s just say, not too much has changed…

Vintage Crafts and More - Mother's Day Sewing Poem

Worthwhile Things
by Doris Wheeler Blount

I’m a busy wife and mother, too.
And life has been good to me:
And for all the joys that have been my lot,
I’m thankful as can be.
But each day in my heart a longing creeps,
As the hours come and go,
For a little time I might call my own,
When I could sit down and sew!

When I awake in the early morn
This thought comes first to mind –
That surely, before the day is done,
An hour of two I’ll find
To embroider a bit on the luncheon-cloth,
Or finish that scarf for Nell.
Or make French knots with those dainty silks
On an apron for Cousin Belle.

I’d like to hemstitch some towels, too,
And make a silk cushion, gay.
And dress up my windows with curtains fine,
Trimmed with cretonne and applique!
And the baby’s rompers with stitching blue,
And the blouses for Betty and John –
With the ducks on the pockets and ’round the hems –
Shall I ever get them done?

For the dishes and pails must first be washed,
And the chickens watered and fed.
And the little ones set at some childish play,
While I bathe and dress baby Ted.
There are sweeping and dusting and beds to do,
And dinner to plan once more,
While the basket of clothes all ready to iron
Must wait till these tasks are o’er.

And then, when the sun is sliding west,
There are lamps and plants to tend.
And the baby to cuddle and feed again,
And the stockings and socks to mend.
But as soon as the supper-hour is past,
And the bedtime-story read,
And dear little white-clad forms have knelt
At my knees while wee prayers are said,

Then the house is still: and I think at last
Here’s the time I have longed for so
But my eyes grow heavy – I cannot see,
And my weary head droops low,
So I fold my work and climb the stair,
Yet deep in my heart I know
That I’ve spent my day in a worthwhile way,
Though I couldn’t sit down and sew!

How to Make a Doll from a Sock – VTNS Freebie Friday

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Today is a fun project, making a doll from a sock. This is great because socks are inexpensive and you can choose from many different patterns and colors.

This can also be a great recycle project for those socks that have lost their mate.  If you’re like me,  you hate to throw them away because you just know the other one will turn up again some day!

Vintage Crafts and More - How to Make a Doll from a Sock Image

 

Vintage Crafts and More - How to Make a Doll from a Sock

 

STOCKING DOLL –

Mark off legs, body, neck and head from top of heavy stocking. Cut off toe of stocking. Make slit for legs. Sew up legs and stuff. This would be a great opportunity to use up leftover stuffing from other projects or pillows. Stuff doll’s body and sew neck line. Stuff head and sew at top. Paint or embroider doll’s features. Add wool hair.

Take the cut off toe of the sock and split down the center to make 2 arms. Sew together and stuff. Sew arms on body in place.

 

Have fun giving your doll personality!

Enjoy!

Sewing Instructions for Closet Organizer Accessories

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

From a 1940’s sewing book, these are quick and easy accessories to brighten your closet. A Shoe Bag, Hanger Cover and Laundry Bag. Not only great for your closet, but perfect to make as gifts.

Vintage Crafts and More - Sewing Instructions for Closet Accessories

The fabric called for is percale or chintz, but I think just about any decorative fabric would work.

Instead of actual patterns, the book gives measurements to use to cut out the pieces and written instructions with diagrams to show you how they are sewn together.

There are 4 pages of instructions to make the 3 closet accessories:

Sewing Instructions for Closet Accessories

The instructions refer to an illustration and explanation about binding. You’ll find that information here:

See Figure 53 Binding

If you have sewn some items as gifts and wouldn’t mind sharing them with us, please be sure to stop by the VTNS Fanpage, we’d love to see your work.

The instructions are in PDF format so to download them you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.


Enjoy!