1925 Star Needlework Journal Vintage Tea Apron Sewing Instructions

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A Vintage Tea Apron

Today’s vintage tea apron sewing pattern instructions are from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal magazine Volume 10 Number 1.  The American Thread Co. published the magazine quarterly. You could have a yearly subscription mailed to you for 40 cents or pay 10 cents for a single copy.

No Pattern, but Materials and Instructions

Actual pattern pieces are not included for this tea apron but instead there is a list of materials required and instructions for sewing. The photo is in black and white, but the true colors are yellow with a black lace trim. Very 1920’s.

A Tea Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

Embroidery Design

For embellishment an embroidery design is included. A simple but fun design to play with.

 

Apron embroidery design - Vintage Crafts and More

If you’d like to download the embroidery design, right click on the image to save it.

 

Just 3/4 yard of 36 inch yellow voile (soft, sheer fabric) material is used. 2¼ yards of black lace and 1¼ yards of ribbon for the tie.  The bottom of the apron has a curved shape. When complete the apron is 23 inches long and 27 inches wide. Try a stronger material or make it bigger, it could easily be done.

 

Apron Sewing Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

A three inch hem is sewn at the top and the sides are shirred (technique that takes a regular piece of fabric and shrinks it up, giving it elasticity) shape. Two strands of black embroidery thread and a small running stitch make up the straight lines on the apron.

Shirring Tips

The Craftsy blog has a Shirring Tips for Beginners post that has some good pointers and Seamingly Smitten has a tutorial on How to Shir Fabric with elastic thread.

Does anyone have some ideas about sewing this apron, changing the size or shirring fabric, please let us know in the comments below.

Link to a Garden Apron

I’ve featured another apron to sew in a previous post you can use to gather garden fruits and vegetables. It also doesn’t have a pattern, only sewing instructions with an illustration.

Here’s the one page PDF file for the 1925 Tea Apron:

Star Needlework Journal – Tea Apron

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!


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1800’s Child’s Pinafore Dress Sewing Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie will take us back to sewing in the 1800’s. Unlike the wonderful sewing patterns we have today, the patterns used in the 19th century were diagrams in magazines such as Peterson’s or Godey’s Ladies.

This is a dainty pinafore dress for a child. The material suggested to sew this pretty pinafore is Mull Muslin, Diaper or Holland.  Each of these is a thin plainwoven, opaque linen or cotton fabric. 

Childs Pinafore Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

The pattern pieces include back, front, side fronts, sleeve, shoulder and trimmings. Measurements are given in inches for each pattern piece. The dotted lines on the pattern pieces represent a fold. You’ll also notice letters and asterisks to match the pieces when sewing. The trimming is your choice and could be lace.

Antique Childs Pinafore Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

You’ll need to draw the pattern using the measurements noted. Probably on wrapping, freezer or shelf paper, taping portions together as necessary. The instructions below suggest using some old muslin rather than paper.

In a May 1877 Peterson’s Ladies Magazine volume an instruction on how to enlarge their diagrams was written. It’s assumed that most ladies of this day knew the fundamentals of sewing, but there must’ve been a few questions about copying the diagrams into a sewing pattern.

Enlarging our Diagrams - May 1877 Petersons Ladies Magazine

This explanation is included with the pattern in the PDF format file link below:

1800s Child’s Pinafore Sewing Pattern

To read a file in PDF format you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Free Basket Apron Pattern to Sew for use in your Home and Garden

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Vegetable and Fruit Basket Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

 

This apron is designed for double duty. It would be great for use around the house and outside in the garden.

 

Touted as “clothing suited to your job”, the easy to sew basket apron is from a 1944 US Department of Agriculture Farmer’s Bulletin ~ Dresses and Aprons for work in the home.

 

 

 

 

 

They go on to write, “A dress that restricts when you reach or bend, that twists or gets in your way when you stoop or climb may be as fatiguing as a poorly planned kitchen.”

Even in 2015 I think this apron would be a great help. More than once I’ve gone out to my garden, started picking veggies, and without a basket tried to balance everything in two hands, dropping many along the way back to the house.

They suggest using a sturdy cotton. I thought maybe even denim would work. You sew a casing for the drawstrings, they recommend shoe laces, and by gathering them on either side, you form a basket.

 

Basket Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

 

There isn’t a pattern with it, but from the illustrations you can see the basics of what you’d need. A large circle of material squared on either end, a waistband that ties in the back and a casing for the drawstring on the rounded edge of the apron.

 

 

How to Sew a Basket Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

To save or print the apron diagram, right click on it and then you can save it for printing. You can also use the Print Friendly button at the bottom of the post.

You can find a similar Harvest Apron Tutorial on The 104 Homestead site and another vintage garden apron in an earlier post on this site.

Here’s a link for a short and informative article about aprons from The Blade newspaper in Toledo, Ohio – Aprons are the fabric of history and home.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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