VTNS Fan Freebie Friday – Vintage Instructions from the 1940s on Making a Man’s Suit into a Woman’s Suit

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Welcome to VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie Friday!

Vintage Crafts and More - Using a man's suit to make a woman's suitEveryone is always talking about recycling cans, paper and bottles, but have you ever thought about recycling your clothes. Specifically changing a man’s suit into a woman’s suit, well that’s what we’re talking about today.

This isn’t a new idea, in fact, the chapter we’re sharing is from a sewing book published in 1943.  Another time in our history when people were looking for ways to recycle what they had. There was rationing and everyone wanted to do their part during World War II to help the nation.

Maybe nowadays we can easily find a suit in any store close by, but there’s been a turn back to a simpler, less consumptive lifestyle and that is a good thing. Many of us are finding great bargains at our local Goodwill or Salvation Army thrift store. A perfect place to find a fashionable man’s suit to use with this project. You may find it made in a wonderful fabric that just isn’t available in a ready made woman’s suit.

This chapter in the sewing book is called Repeat Performance. A very suitable name for remaking a man’s suit. They do suggest using commercial pattern pieces to put your suit together. VTNS members have several suit patterns available. Illustrations of two different pattern layouts are shown with the instructions.

This is a great starting point to begin coming up with more ideas for clothing recycling projects. Be sure to share any you have on our VTNS Facebook Fanpage.Vintage Crafts and More - Instructions for recycling a man's suit into a woman's suit

 

Making a Man’s Suit into a Woman’s Suit

The instructions are in pdf format so to download the file you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.


Enjoy!

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Vintage Traveling Slippers and Espadrilles Sewing Pattern

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Welcome to VTNS Fan Freebie Friday! These slippers and espadrilles will be a fine addition to pack for your upcoming summer travels.

The patterns today come from a 1940s sewing book that was found in many women’s homes during this era. Called an Encyclopedia of Modern Sewing it does cover almost every aspect you would need to learn the craft. Along with the many teaching tools in this book are patterns for sewing.

Vintage Crafts and More - Traveling Slippers and Espardrilles Sewing Pattern

The two we’ve chosen today are for slippers and ribbon espadrilles. The patterns are on a 1 inch grid and will need to be enlarged. We’ve included instructions from the book for doing that. Also there are a couple illustrations in the book that the patterns point to that are included below.

Traveling Slippers Pattern and Instructions

Espadrilles Pattern and Instructions

You’ll notice that these patterns and instructions refer to several illustrated figures on the book. You can find them here:

How to Enlarge a Pattern, Turn and Whip Stitch

On these pages is a great illustrated tutorial on Bias Strips:

Slippers Figures 48 to 54 Bias Strips

The patterns are in pdf format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link below and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

Vintage Clown Toy Pattern – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Today for our fan freebie we are sharing a simple to make vintage toy pattern from one our members. It’s a Make-A-Toy-Club Pattern for a stuffed clown. Great for a gift, easy to customize using fabric and embroidery. It would be a great little addition to an Easter basket.

Toto the toy clown

I did start to put one together. It’s very easy to match up the pattern pages. I used fabric from my stash and stuffing from a small couch pillow I had intended to recover some day. Remember to clip and trim the curves before turning and make sure you put the arms inside as you sew around the body to attach them.

He measures about 18 inches tall to the top of his hat. Unfortunately, I had some other pressing things to get done so I had to set my clown aside for now, but it was fun and I loved how the body came out. Soft, cuddly and just the right size. I didn’t want to take a picture of him without his head.

The pattern pages are in pdf format so to read them once they’re downloaded you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the links below and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using.

This first one is a zip file that contains all 3 pages of patterns and instructions. It can be downloaded and then unzipped using WinZip which is found on most computers:

Vintage Clown Doll Stuffed Toy Pattern

This is the individual pattern and instruction pages.

Vintage Clown Doll Stuffed Toy Pattern Page 1

Vintage Clown Doll Stuffed Toy Pattern Page 2

Vintage Clown Doll Stuffed Toy Pattern Instructions

Victorian Infant Baby Shoe Pattern

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 Full Sized Pattern of Baby’s Shoe – Circa 1870

Victorian Infant Baby Shoe Pattern

Today I’ve found in one of my Peterson’s Magazines an adorable little baby shoe pattern from 1870. It can be made of many different materials. The article suggests cashmere or flannel, but I think felt would be cute as well.

The embroidery on it is a chain of silk thread. I believe any kind of floss could be used to follow the diagram of embroidery on the shoe.

The pattern is for one half of the shoe and sole. With A and B forming the sole. I think this would be easy to put together and if I have time I’m going to try one.

You could do many wonderful embellishments to this little shoe to make it your own, for a gift or to sell, but I wouldn’t use any small items, such as buttons, that could easily fall off and be choked on. Babies are always trying to put their little feet in their mouths.

Click here to download or print out a pdf copy of the Victorian Baby Shoe Pattern. This is a full size pattern for the baby shoe, but I feel it could easily be adjusted for a bigger size by uniformly adding inches to the basic pattern.

For more information about Peterson’s Magazines, check out this site.

Quick Sewing Tip for Storing Bias Tape Rolls

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Lately my husband and I, in an effort to lose weight and be healthy, have been eating those 100 calorie thin Deli Flats bread. I finished one off yesterday and looking at the plastic container realized they would make a great place to store my Clover Quick Bias tape rolls.

Sure enough, I tried one out and they fit perfectly. Now these containers are flimsy but just to set on a shelf in my sewing cabinet, they’ll keep them organized and easy to find. Nice!

storage solution

Perfect fit!

Sewing Cabinet Storage

Inside sewing cabinet

 

I use Clover Quick Bias tape to make stained glass quilts. Easy to use because it just irons on. It’s perfect for Celtic and applique quilts too.

 

 

I made and sold this table runner a couple years ago:

stained glass quilt

The grocery store, you can find storage solutions for your sewing room there!

Enjoy!

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