A Godey’s Lady’s Book Star Design For Quilting

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Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine

Today’s quilting pattern comes from a Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine published in America in the 19th century for women. Below is one of the beautiful fashion plates included in these books.

Godey's Lady's Book Fashion Plate 1859

A Lady’s Book

In 1830 when Louis A. Godey first published this women’s magazine it was titled simply Lady’s Book. Around 1840 he added Godey’s to the title. Publishing stopped in 1898 and was taken over by another magazine The Puritan, A Journal For Gentlewomen.

Among one of the first and most successful editors of an American women’s magazine was Sarah Josepha Hale (link to a short biography of her on Encyclopedia Britannica).  She began editing Godey’s Lady’s Book after 1837. During that time until 1860 the circulation went from 70,000 to nearly 150,000 copies every month.

Godey’s left politics out of his magazine. Each monthly issue was filled with short stories, recipes, patterns, illustrations and what it’s best known for, the lovely hand-colored fashion plates.

The Complete Page

As an example I’ve included the entire page the star design came from. I’m not sure when in the 1800’s this design was published there was no date on this loose page.

Godey's Lady's Book - Vintage Crafts and More

Looking for Full Issues to Download

The Hathi Trust Digital Library has a Catalog Record of full scanned editions of the Godey’s Lady’s Magazine from Libraries and Universities. Click on any issue and a full scanned e-book will display. In the column to the left of the display page is several options. One of them is “Get this Book” with the option to download a page or the complete issue as a PDF.

On the right side of the display are options to see one page at a time, scroll or flip through the pages, thumbnails of all the pages and more. Put a couple hours aside, because once you start looking around it’s hard to stop.

Design For Quilting

Not only can this design be used for quilting but coloring, embroidery and applique come to mind. Use your photo editing software or printer to resize the image.

Godey's Lady's Book Design for Quilting - Vintage Crafts and More

Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save image as” depending on what browser you are using. Also you can click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save the image.

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Enjoy!

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Lovely Rose Design for a Slipper in Berlin Wool Work

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Berlin wool work is a type of embroidery similar to today’s needlepoint. Typically it’s wool yarn on canvas. For the most part, it is worked in a single stitch, like cross stitch, but some books demonstrate several different stitches for use in Berlin work.

Berlin wool work pinterest

Most notable for the bright dyes and colors of yarn in the designs, it is also a  durable type of embroidery that can be used for furniture, cushions, bags and some clothing.

Berlin wool work started in Berlin, Germany, early in the 19th century. At first, the patterns were printed in black and white on a grid and later hand-colored. You can find Berlin wool work one page patterns published in ladies’ magazines in the 1800’s.

During the Victorian Era Berlin work became popular as more women had leisure time to do needlework. The designs during this period were romantic, floral and some times quotations such as “Home Sweet Home”.

Once the Arts and Crafts movement came along, tastes changed and Berlin wool work wasn’t as popular.

Rose Slipper Pattern

This is a beautiful pattern for a slipper done in Berlin wool work. There are lovely shaded red roses and leaves stitched on the top and sides of the slipper. Published in The Young Ladies Journal in July 1882, this Victorian design could also be used as counted cross stitch.

 

Design for Slipper in Berlin Wool Work

PDF File for Download

Design for Slipper in Berlin Wool Work PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

antique pattern library berlin wool work patterns

Another Berlin Wool Work Slipper Pattern

For another Victorian Berlin Wool Work Slipper pattern see this blog post.

Antique Pattern Library

The Antique Pattern Library has more slipper patterns and many others on their Berlin Wool Work Resource Page.

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A Lesson on Hemstitching Drawn Thread Needlework

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Hemstitching

It’s a popular type of ornamental needlework where you arrange and group threads in different ways. Hemstitching is a type of openwork, the warp of threads are drawn from the fabric and then drawn together by various stitches that form open patterns.

 

A Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

 

By grouping and sewing the threads in different stitches you can make up many combinations of design. Hemstitching can be the sole decoration on the piece or can be combined with other types of embroidery.

For simple hemstitching, draw out threads above the edge of a hem that has been basted in to any desired width.

Then with a needle and thread cross and group the threads making decorative clusters.

 

 

Mexican Drawn Thread Work

This hemstitching is similar to Mexican Drawn Thread Work. Previously, I wrote a post on that. Find it here: Mexican Thread Drawn Work Instructions and Patterns

 

Lesson on Hemstitching

Lesson on Hemstitching

 

PDF file to download below

This is a two page PDF file of the pages above that explains what hemstitching is and has instructions and illustrations for doing drawn thread work.

Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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