A Godey’s Lady’s Book Star Design For Quilting

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Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine

Today’s quilting pattern comes from a Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine published in America in the 19th century for women. Below is one of the beautiful fashion plates included in these books.

Godey's Lady's Book Fashion Plate 1859

A Lady’s Book

In 1830 when Louis A. Godey first published this women’s magazine it was titled simply Lady’s Book. Around 1840 he added Godey’s to the title. Publishing stopped in 1898 and was taken over by another magazine The Puritan, A Journal For Gentlewomen.

Among one of the first and most successful editors of an American women’s magazine was Sarah Josepha Hale (link to a short biography of her on Encyclopedia Britannica).  She began editing Godey’s Lady’s Book after 1837. During that time until 1860 the circulation went from 70,000 to nearly 150,000 copies every month.

Godey’s left politics out of his magazine. Each monthly issue was filled with short stories, recipes, patterns, illustrations and what it’s best known for, the lovely hand-colored fashion plates.

The Complete Page

As an example I’ve included the entire page the star design came from. I’m not sure when in the 1800’s this design was published there was no date on this loose page.

Godey's Lady's Book - Vintage Crafts and More

Looking for Full Issues to Download

The Hathi Trust Digital Library has a Catalog Record of full scanned editions of the Godey’s Lady’s Magazine from Libraries and Universities. Click on any issue and a full scanned e-book will display. In the column to the left of the display page is several options. One of them is “Get this Book” with the option to download a page or the complete issue as a PDF.

On the right side of the display are options to see one page at a time, scroll or flip through the pages, thumbnails of all the pages and more. Put a couple hours aside, because once you start looking around it’s hard to stop.

Design For Quilting

Not only can this design be used for quilting but coloring, embroidery and applique come to mind. Use your photo editing software or printer to resize the image.

Godey's Lady's Book Design for Quilting - Vintage Crafts and More

Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save image as” depending on what browser you are using. Also you can click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save the image.

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Lovely Rose Design for a Slipper in Berlin Wool Work

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Berlin wool work is a type of embroidery similar to today’s needlepoint. Typically it’s wool yarn on canvas. For the most part, it is worked in a single stitch, like cross stitch, but some books demonstrate several different stitches for use in Berlin work.

Berlin wool work pinterest

Most notable for the bright dyes and colors of yarn in the designs, it is also a  durable type of embroidery that can be used for furniture, cushions, bags and some clothing.

Berlin wool work started in Berlin, Germany, early in the 19th century. At first, the patterns were printed in black and white on a grid and later hand-colored. You can find Berlin wool work one page patterns published in ladies’ magazines in the 1800’s.

During the Victorian Era Berlin work became popular as more women had leisure time to do needlework. The designs during this period were romantic, floral and some times quotations such as “Home Sweet Home”.

Once the Arts and Crafts movement came along, tastes changed and Berlin wool work wasn’t as popular.

Rose Slipper Pattern

This is a beautiful pattern for a slipper done in Berlin wool work. There are lovely shaded red roses and leaves stitched on the top and sides of the slipper. Published in The Young Ladies Journal in July 1882, this Victorian design could also be used as counted cross stitch.

 

Design for Slipper in Berlin Wool Work

PDF File for Download

Design for Slipper in Berlin Wool Work PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

antique pattern library berlin wool work patterns

Another Berlin Wool Work Slipper Pattern

For another Victorian Berlin Wool Work Slipper pattern see this blog post.

Antique Pattern Library

The Antique Pattern Library has more slipper patterns and many others on their Berlin Wool Work Resource Page.

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A Lesson on Hemstitching Drawn Thread Needlework

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Hemstitching

It’s a popular type of ornamental needlework where you arrange and group threads in different ways. Hemstitching is a type of openwork, the warp of threads are drawn from the fabric and then drawn together by various stitches that form open patterns.

 

A Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

 

By grouping and sewing the threads in different stitches you can make up many combinations of design. Hemstitching can be the sole decoration on the piece or can be combined with other types of embroidery.

For simple hemstitching, draw out threads above the edge of a hem that has been basted in to any desired width.

Then with a needle and thread cross and group the threads making decorative clusters.

 

 

Mexican Drawn Thread Work

This hemstitching is similar to Mexican Drawn Thread Work. Previously, I wrote a post on that. Find it here: Mexican Thread Drawn Work Instructions and Patterns

 

Lesson on Hemstitching

Lesson on Hemstitching

 

PDF file to download below

This is a two page PDF file of the pages above that explains what hemstitching is and has instructions and illustrations for doing drawn thread work.

Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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A Scholehouse For The Needle Book Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

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embroidery-sprigs-bug-vintage-crafts-and-moreThe embroidery sprigs found on this blog post are from the pattern book A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker published in 1632, but I found these examples in a book titled Embroidery edited by Mrs. Archibald H. Christie and published in 1909.

 

Embroidery Book

It is “A collection of articles on subjects connected with the study of fine needlework, including stitches, materials, methods of work, and designing, and history, with numerous illustrations and coloured plates of modern work.

Here are more embroidery books written and edited by Mrs. Grace Christie.

 

The book I used I found on Archive.org. You can choose from several different download options. I usually download the PDF file. It’s easy and fast, just remember where you save it so you can find it later. Most of the time I save mine to the desktop, then I move them to the proper file. Here’s the link:  Embroidery.

Samplers and Pattern Books

When you study collections of samplers from a long time ago, you’ll notice that they often have certain details in common. Such as a little cross stitch bird, baskets of fruit and flowers, borders and floral sprigs. That leads us to believe that the needleworkers of that time may have chosen elements for their designs from the same book of patterns.

Few of these pattern books survived in comparison to the great many that once existed, but it’s not surprising, since they were greatly used, often pricked through the print of the pattern and pounced through perforations onto the material. This way of making tracings, and sometimes pages being ripped out, most certainly hurt the books, making editions very hard to find.

History of Lace

For more information on old pattern books, Mrs. Bury Palliser’s History of Lace has an appendix with a long list of them with descriptive notes. You can find this book and many others at Archive.org.

There is a copy published in 1865 and also one that was published ten years later in 1875.  They are in several languages and cover the period of 1527 to 1784. Many of them concern lace, but some of the books have designs specially arranged for embroidery.

If you’d like a hard copy of History of Lace by Mrs. Bury Palliser, Dover Publishing has a reproduced copy available on Amazon. I did find a couple originals for sale, but they were $94 and up.

A Scholehouse For The Needle

One English book, which has special interest for embroiderers is A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker printed in London in 1632. It’s a teaching book with patterns and examples with an emphasis on arranging your own designs.

For this reason even today this book is beneficial but hard to find. Doing a search for it, all I found were reproduced copies. Some of them costing hundreds of dollars. I didn’t see any originals available. One reproduced book on Etsy was $32 and ships from the United Kingdom.

I found several images of individual book pages available here and there on the internet when I did a Google search for them.

Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

It’s interesting to see examples of seventeenth-century patterns. The sprigs are in rows in the book. You’ll find many similar designs on the embroidered clothing of that time period.

 

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs and Bug

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs

 

In addition to using the patterns individually, you can build up the designs by arranging them in groups.

Here’s an Example

A Scholehouse for the Needle embroidery sprigs design

The figure to the right used the rose like spray, second to last on the first row of designs, its repeated four times. The main stem radiating outward. You’ll find the detached sprig in the second row of designs at the end.

A frame surrounds it and shows how a design can develop into something new.

 

 

 

To print or save the images, click on them, they will open in a new window and there you can save or print them.

In addition to saving or printing them from this post, I’ve made a one sheet PDF file you can download below:

Embroidery Designs From A Scholehouse For The Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Filet Crochet Edging Patterns for Lace Altar Cloths and Robes

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Today’s free vintage pattern is for filet crochet edgings. The designs I’m featuring are church laces for altars or robes.

The church lace filet crochet edging patterns are included in the Coats & Clark’s crochet Book No. 320 titled Edgings for all purposes including Church Laces.

Cross Grape and Vines Filet Crochet Edging Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Chart for Design Gauges

A chart is included with these designs that gives the Approximate Depth of Lace for each design, Thread Size, Hook Size and Gauge per inch.

 

Filet Crochet Edging Patterns for Altars and Robes - Vintage Crafts and More

Filet Crochet Edging Patterns for Altars and Robes Lily Chalice - Vintage Crafts and More

Download the PDF file here:

Filet Crochet Edging Patterns for Altars and Robes

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Embossed Daisy Placemat Free Filet Crochet Pattern

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Today’s free vintage crochet pattern is a pretty daisy placemat for Spring. It’s from a 1950’s Lily Mills booklet. The placemat measures 12 x 18 inches with daisies wrapped around a lace mesh middle. There are pretty scalloped edges too.

Embossed Daisy Placemat Crochet Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Materials required:

The listed choices of materials you can use are:

Daisy Mercerized Crochet Cotton, Art 65, White, Size 30 OR
Lily Mercerized Crochet Cotton, Art 36, White, Size 30 OR
Lily Mercerized Crochet Cotton, Art 161, White, Size 30

After working with vintage crochet patterns for years, I still have questions about what the Art number means on these types of vintage threads. I don’t believe it’s meant to be the color or the size of thread, but it may be a number assigned to signify the amount of thread in the ball or skein.

The closest I’ve come to an answer is it may have been the product name similar to “Classic” or “Cebelia” today. If anyone knows, please leave a comment on this post.

Because the threads required are no longer made, these two threads would be a fine substitute for the vintage ones listed above. Both are a Size 30 Mercerized Cotton:  Aunt Lydia’s Extra Fine Crochet Cotton OR DMC Cebelia Crochet Cotton.

If you find the type of Crochet Cotton to use confusing, this post on the Red Heart Yarn website called the Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Thread Crochet will be helpful.

The crochet hook is size No. 13 and the Gauge is 6 sps = 1 inch; 6 rows = 1 inch. It always helps to have the gauge in these vintage crochet patterns.

Placemat Crochet Pattern Chart:

The circles on the chart indicate where the embossed daisies go.

Embossed Daisy Placemat Free Crochet Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More
Since you may want to save this chart for later, you can click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save or print it. There is a PDF file available for download below.

Abbreviations you’ll need to know

ch = chain        dc = double crochet       rnd = round    sc = single crochet
hdc = half double crochet   sl st = slip stitch       lp = loop      sp(s) = space(s)
st = stitch  sk = skip   cluster dec = cluster decrease   yo = yarn over

* Repeat from asterisk (*) as many times as specified in instructions.
(  ) Repeat everything within parenthesis (  ) as many times as specified.

 

Instructions for the Embossed Daisy Placemat

Embossed Daisy Placemat Crochet Pattern Instructions

PDF file to download:

Here’s the PDF file you can download for later. It’s two pages.

Embossed Daisy Place Mat Crochet Pattern PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Quite A Quacker Duck Amigurumi Vintage Crochet Pattern

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I have the cutest little duck crochet pattern to share. Today we call them Amigurumi which means a crocheted or knitted stuffed toy.

Where does the name Amigurumi come from?

The word comes from the Japanese words ami, meaning crocheted or knitted, and nuigurumi, meaning stuffed doll. Most Amigurumi are animals but they can be people or just about any object that is crocheted or knitted and stuffed.

 

Quite A Quacker Duck Amigurumi Vintage Crochet Pattern

 

Perfect for the Easter Basket

This would be perfect for an Easter basket or a gift or decoration at a baby shower. The pattern is from an American Thread Star Book titled Aunt Lydia’s Design Studio. The booklet doesn’t have a date listed, but by the looks of the fashions it should be late 1960’s, early 1970’s. With a little investigating, I was right, the date is 1970.

Where to find Aunt Lydia’s Rug Yarn

Quite A Quacker Duck Amigurumi Crochet Pattern Materials

The yarn required for the duck crochet pattern is Aunt Lydia’s Rug Yarn.  The yarn colors are White and Bongo (Tangerine Orange).

There are a few hundred listings for Aunt Lydia’s Rug Yarn on ebay in a variety of colors. I even found a package of two Bongo 70 yard skeins.

 

There is plenty of Aunt Lydia’s Rug Yarn on Amazon too.

The gauge of 3 sts = 1 inch is given in this crochet pattern so that helps. Two buttons are used for the eyes, but if it’s a gift for a baby or toddler I’d substitute something that cannot be removed. Maybe use some black yarn sewn on in a circle for each eye.

PDF file is below:

This is a two page pattern with the photo of the finished duck.

Quite A Quacker Duck Amigurumi Vintage Crochet Pattern

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Crochet Flower Basket Pattern from Smart Chair Sets Coats and Clark’s Booklet

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Crochet Flower Basket

Spring has sprung and what better way to welcome Spring than with a pretty crochet flower basket pattern. This one comes from a 1954 Coats & Clark’s book titled Smart Chair Sets.

Crochet Flower Basket Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Even though this is a chair set the pretty flower baskets could be used many other ways. Such as an applique on a blanket or pillow. Just set it on a table as a doily and I’m sure there are more you can think of.

 

Crochet Flower Basket Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

The chair back flower basket measures 11 x 17 inches and each arm piece measures 7 x 11 inches. Pretty good size.

Basket Towel Applique Set

Flower Basket Photo by polychrome on Flickr

 

Another smaller and quicker option but just as pretty is this crochet flower basket pattern for appliqueing on towels. It’s from a 1950’s Spool Cotton Company booklet.

You’ll find it for free on the Ravelry website, a community of crafters that share projects, patterns and ideas.

 

 

 

 

What thread should I use?

The J & P Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen thread Article A64 is a 4-ply 100% mercerized Size 10 cotton. You can find vintage Knit-Cro-Sheen crochet thread for sale on ebay. Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Thread Classic 10 would be a suitable substitute.

 

Pattern PDF file download

The PDF file is one page.

Basket of Flowers Crochet Pattern PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Armenian Edging Stitch Instructions from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine

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The article on the Armenian Edging Stitch in the 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine is titled One Makes This Lace With a Sewing Needle. There are instructions for three different designs. All of them start with a loop stitch across the material. Then by adding additional stitches you can build a pretty lace edge.

 

Armenian Edging Stitch Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle - Vintage Crafts and More

The instructions use a very fine crochet cotton to sew the edgings. A size 50 or 60 in white. Crochet cotton thread is sized by weight with each weight identified by a number. The lower the size number the thicker it is. The higher the crochet cotton’s weight number the finer the thread. So a Size 3 is heavier than a Size 10.

Armenian Edge Stitch - Vintage Crafts and More

Let’s Learn the Armenian Edging Stitch

Now you could try your hand at making an Armenian Edge Stitch following the directions above or I’ve found several blog tutorials and a YouTube video series that will help you master this stitch.

First of all, on the Artyfibres blog Sarah Whittle demonstrates stitches with step-by-step pictured tutorials. In her Stitch A-Z group she has a tutorial on the Armenian Edging Stitch. It’s very easy to follow as each pictured step has a number for your needle to follow.

Another well done tutorial is on the embroidery blog Kimberly Ouimet. She calls the Armenian Edge Stitch a Knot Stitch Edging and states that it is also known as Antwerp Stitch Edging.

Either way, it’s a good tutorial on this edging stitch. Her stitch looks very similar to a Blanket Stitch since she goes a little higher on the edge of the material. But again a very good tutorial with many pictures to break down each step in the stitch.

Last but not least is The Henry Art Gallery Embroidery Stitch Identification Guide.  There’s a diagram of the Armenian Edge Stitch as-well-as an Antwerp Edge. If you need to find a stitch this is a great site because all you have to do is click on the alphabetical Index of stitches.

The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work

This YouTube series has 8 parts on How to do Needle Lace, The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work. It’s really beautiful and it helps to see someone actually doing it.

In the comments the instructor, Ashley says there are very few if any books or patterns for this type of lace. She hopes that by doing these videos she encourages people to learn so there will be a renewed interest in this craft. If the comments on the videos are any indication, I’d say she is succeeding.

Scanned One Page PDF File

Armenian Edging Stitch – Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Free Crochet Bag Pattern to Hold Your Knitting A Crocheted Knitting Bag

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Today’s crochet bag pattern freebie could be an oxymoron. A Crocheted Knitting Bag. Many times those of us that crochet also knit. So this bag would make sense. Some like one craft more than the other. Which do you prefer? Or do you like both.

 

Crochet Bag Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

 

This pattern is from an American Thread Company Star Book titled Crocheted Fashions. The crocheted bag uses Heavy Crochet Mercerized Cotton in Forest Green and White.

Vintage Thread

This vintage thread is similar to a Size 5 crochet thread. The balls contained 100 yards. Use a No. 4 steel crochet hook, but since no gauge is given, you’ll have to experiment. Knitting sticks or handles complete the top of the crochet bag.

 

Star Fast Heavy Crochet Cotton Crochet Bag Pattern

 

 

 

This is a picture of the American Thread Company “Star” Fast Heavy Crochet Mercerized Cotton from the booklet.

 

 

 

 

 


I did a search on Amazon and came up with DMC Petra Crochet Cotton Size 5. It looks similar.

 

 

Make sure to read the shipping times carefully on these threads. A couple of them I noticed say “usually ships in 1 to 3 months.” I don’t know about you, but I want my thread a lot sooner than that.

PDF File to Download

The full pattern and crochet abbreviations are in the one page PDF file below.

Crocheted Knitting Bag Pattern

To read the pattern you’ll need Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

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