A Scholehouse For The Needle Book Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

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embroidery-sprigs-bug-vintage-crafts-and-moreThe embroidery sprigs found on this blog post are from the pattern book A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker published in 1632, but I found these examples in a book titled Embroidery edited by Mrs. Archibald H. Christie and published in 1909.

 

Embroidery Book

It is “A collection of articles on subjects connected with the study of fine needlework, including stitches, materials, methods of work, and designing, and history, with numerous illustrations and coloured plates of modern work.

Here are more embroidery books written and edited by Mrs. Grace Christie.

 

The book I used I found on Archive.org. You can choose from several different download options. I usually download the PDF file. It’s easy and fast, just remember where you save it so you can find it later. Most of the time I save mine to the desktop, then I move them to the proper file. Here’s the link:  Embroidery.

Samplers and Pattern Books

When you study collections of samplers from a long time ago, you’ll notice that they often have certain details in common. Such as a little cross stitch bird, baskets of fruit and flowers, borders and floral sprigs. That leads us to believe that the needleworkers of that time may have chosen elements for their designs from the same book of patterns.

Few of these pattern books survived in comparison to the great many that once existed, but it’s not surprising, since they were greatly used, often pricked through the print of the pattern and pounced through perforations onto the material. This way of making tracings, and sometimes pages being ripped out, most certainly hurt the books, making editions very hard to find.

History of Lace

For more information on old pattern books, Mrs. Bury Palliser’s History of Lace has an appendix with a long list of them with descriptive notes. You can find this book and many others at Archive.org.

There is a copy published in 1865 and also one that was published ten years later in 1875.  They are in several languages and cover the period of 1527 to 1784. Many of them concern lace, but some of the books have designs specially arranged for embroidery.

If you’d like a hard copy of History of Lace by Mrs. Bury Palliser, Dover Publishing has a reproduced copy available on Amazon. I did find a couple originals for sale, but they were $94 and up.

A Scholehouse For The Needle

One English book, which has special interest for embroiderers is A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker printed in London in 1632. It’s a teaching book with patterns and examples with an emphasis on arranging your own designs.

For this reason even today this book is beneficial but hard to find. Doing a search for it, all I found were reproduced copies. Some of them costing hundreds of dollars. I didn’t see any originals available. One reproduced book on Etsy was $32 and ships from the United Kingdom.

I found several images of individual book pages available here and there on the internet when I did a Google search for them.

Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

It’s interesting to see examples of seventeenth-century patterns. The sprigs are in rows in the book. You’ll find many similar designs on the embroidered clothing of that time period.

 

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs and Bug

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs

 

In addition to using the patterns individually, you can build up the designs by arranging them in groups.

Here’s an Example

A Scholehouse for the Needle embroidery sprigs design

The figure to the right used the rose like spray, second to last on the first row of designs, its repeated four times. The main stem radiating outward. You’ll find the detached sprig in the second row of designs at the end.

A frame surrounds it and shows how a design can develop into something new.

 

 

 

To print or save the images, click on them, they will open in a new window and there you can save or print them.

In addition to saving or printing them from this post, I’ve made a one sheet PDF file you can download below:

Embroidery Designs From A Scholehouse For The Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Cross Stitch Snowflakes or Border Embroidery Patterns

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Today I’m posting a chart from an antique French embroidery design booklet. The charts are quick and easy cross stitch for what looks like snowflakes or designs that could be used as a border.

Imagine them scattered on a decorative pillow cover in red and white, blue and white or as a border on a towel or pillowcase.

old time cross stitch snowflakes - vintage crafts and more

Also a couple of the designs could be used with the craft of “chicken scratch” on gingham. If you’ve never heard of it, I’ve done a blog post about it titled Chicken Scratch Embroidery – What is it and how to do it.

Be sure to check out this previous blog post of the Alphabet in Cross Stitch for Monograms.

To Download Chart: Right-Click on the image and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save or print it.


If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns. Please feel free to share your latest projects in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

How To Shuttle Tat and 8 Tatted Edging Patterns

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie includes instructions on shuttle tatting and eight pretty tatted edging patterns. Here’s a sample of one of them.

No. 3003 Tatted Edging Pattern Photo - Vintage Crafts and MoreNo. 3003 Tatted Edging Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

They come from a 1944 American Thread Company booklet entitled Tatted & Crocheted Designs, Star Book 30. I enjoy reading the introductions to these vintage booklets. The one for this booklet is no exception:

Ageless beauty of lace for your home — a touch of frosted white, crisp as the first snow flake, can be yours for so little effort, so little time. A romantic luncheon set to show off your treasured china — like a lace ruff around an old-fashioned nose-gay. Fragile and feminine doilies. A baby cap that will make a cherub look like a Gainsborough miniature. [Gainsborough was a painter of miniatures in the 1700’s.]

 

Tatting is a lovely art. The many exquisite designs in this book can be easily made.

Here’s the pretty set of 8 tatted edgings you’ll find pattern instructions for:

 

Set of 8 Tatted Edging Patterns - Vintage Crafts and More

 

Tatting has it’s very own category on the right side of this blog where you’ll find more instructions and patterns in earlier posts.

This booklet offers a set of instructions for Shuttle Tatting:

 

Tatting Instructions Page 1 - Vintage Crafts and MoreTatting Instructions Page 2 - Vintage Crafts and More

The instructions and all 8 tatted edging patterns are in the 4 page PDF below:

Tatted Instructions and Edging Patterns PDF

The patterns are in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Irish Crochet Lace Edgings Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Irish Crochet Lace Edging Patterns

 

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated here in the US on March 17th, that’s coming up soon, so I thought I’d share some Irish Crochet Edgings. These patterns are from a Clark’s (Spool Cotton Company) crochet booklet of EDGINGS printed in 1942.

 

 

Irish crochet is one of my favorites. I love how dainty, delicate and lacy it turns out. I’ve written and shared Irish crochet patterns on a couple other blog posts, check them out here.

 

Irish Crochet Lace Edging Patterns

Click on the pattern page and it will open in another window where you can save or print it from your computer’s browser. If you’d like to save the file for later in PDF format, find it below:

Irish Crochet Lace Edging Patterns PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!


This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Fancy Antique Alphabet Patterns for Embroidery Monograms

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie is a set of fancy alphabet letters you can use for embroidery or other crafting. Young embroiderers used the alphabets to practice their stitches and went on to use them to create samplers, quilts and other household items.

Antique A to Embroidery - Vintage Crafts and More

This is the A and the rest of the alphabet is just as pretty.  I believe this page was pulled from one of my Peterson’s Ladies Magazines. It’s certainly over 100 years old.

I’ve cleaned up the page, but haven’t gone over the outline of the letters so there may be some gaps here and there that you’ll have to fill in when you trace them.

You can find some diagrams of basic embroidery stitches in this earlier post of mine and Craftsy has a some very good photos and instructions of how to do 10 Hand Embroidery Stitches. These will help you get started.

 

Antique Alphabet to Embroidery - Vintage Crafts and More

To save or print the alphabet page above, simply click on it, it will open in another window where you can save or print it using your computer’s browser. You can also use the little green Print Friendly Button at the bottom of the post.

If you’d like to save it for later in PDF format, the link is below:

Antique Alphabet to Embroidery

The pattern sheet is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here. There are also free Adobe Reader Apps for mobile devices.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Mexican Drawn Thread Work Instructions and Patterns

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Mexican Drawn Work

Recently Cinco de Mayo was celebrated and it reminded me of the beautiful Mexican Drawn Work embroidery I’ve seen.

Mexican Drawn Thread Work Patterns and Instructions

I didn’t find a lot of information on Mexican drawn thread work, but I have a book about it that was originally published in 1889 titled Fifty Designs for Mexican Drawn Work.

You can find a reproduced copy for sale on the internet and some original copies too. Below I share some of the instructions from this booklet.

 

 

Drawn Thread

The craft of drawn thread has been around a long time. It’s a kind of openwork on linen where you remove some of the threads from the base fabric then rearrange or decorate the remaining threads with stitchery.

This embroidery technique is especially for doilies, table and dresser scarfs, place mats and anywhere you might use a decorative cloth.

To choose the linen for your project look for a plain cloth that will be easy to draw. Make sure the threads are even and without lumps. The grade of linen you choose will depend on it’s use. A finer cloth for a baby’s pillowcase and a more durable cloth for an everyday table.

Use an eight or twenty weight crochet cotton for stitching. It’s best when the cotton is coarser than the woven threads of the fabric. A nice silk thread would give a nice effect as well.

A frame for your work is very important so that the item will be evenly and firmly stretched. A round embroidery ring in sizes three to eighteen inches in diameter would work too.

When the edge of the work is to be finished with a hem, the hem is usually hem-stitched.

Hemstitching

For information about hemstitching with this technique I’ve included the instructional PDF below:

Drawn Thread Work Hemstitching

Embroidery Stitches Used in Drawn Thread Work

Many of the stitches used in Mexican Drawn Thread Work are common embroidery stitches. The PDF below is 17 pages from an antique publication. The pages include instructions and illustrations for embroidery stitches used in drawn thread work.

Drawn Thread Work Stitches

Drawn Thread Work Small Table Cloth

A Tablecloth Pattern

As shown above, I’ve separated out and rewritten a small tablecloth pattern from the same publication. You’ll find it here:

Drawn Thread Work Small Table Cloth

Patterns for Edging

In addition to the tablecloth pattern, I found several edging patterns that you can use on tea towels, pillows and handkerchiefs.

Drawn Thread Work Edging Patterns

All in all this really is a fascinating type of embroidery that has many possibilities for use once you’ve mastered the basics.

PDF Download Instructions

You’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer to read the PDFs. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link below and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

National Embroidery Month – Embroidery Hints and Tips

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cross stitch border patternThe  ancient craft of embroidery is being celebrated this month.  Ancient, because examples of surviving Chinese chain stitch embroidery worked in silk thread have been dated to the Warring States period (5th-3rd century BC ).

When you think of embroidery there are many words that come under it’s heading.  Such as, Cross Stitch, Hardanger, Redwork, Berlin Work, Crewel, Needlepoint, and Smocking just to name a few.

Most of the time embroidery is done by hand, but the computerized embroidery machines available today provide wonderful designs to choose from and the machine does all the work.

We’ve selected some great patterns to share, but first here are some hints and tips about embroidery you’ll need to know before you get started:

EMBROIDERY THREADS . . . Your choice of threads will depend upon the type of embroidery on which you intend to work. Mercerized threads may be used on most light weight fabrics. Heavier cotton thread produces a rich and unusual effect in certain designs. Wool is suitable for use on heavier fabrics.

Silk embroidered mum and leaf patternAll embroidery threads should be boil fast. To work with inferior materials and threads is a foolish waste of time.  When the working thread begins to acquire a fuzz or becomes untwisted, take a new one.

EMBROIDERY NEEDLES . . . The needle with which you embroider opens the weave of the material to enable the embroidery thread to slide through easily. Therefore, when you choose an embroidery needle, the eye should be slightly larger than the thickness of the embroidery thread. Almost all embroidery needles have a much longer eye than sewing needles. The needle ordinarily used is called a crewel needle. The length of the average embroidery needle is about 1¾ inches. A longer needle hinders the worker in gaining speed.

SCISSORS . . . Embroidery scissors should be about 4 to 5 inches long and should have very sharp points.

BEGINNINGS AND FINISHINGS . . .The wrong side of the work should look equally as well as the right side. To begin a piece of embroidery do not use a knot, but make a close running stitch toward the starting point, then make a small back stitch and begin to embroider in the direction specified.

To end your thread, weave the needle in and out of the material under the piece which has just been completed, but do not allow your needle to pick up any of the embroidery stitches. When you feel that the end of the thread is perfectly secure, cut the thread close to the embroidery. Do not carry your thread from one design to the other, as this produces very untidy work.

PRESSING . . . All embroidery should be pressed on a thickly padded surface. The raised face of the embroidery sinks into the softness of the padding and is not flattened by the iron. Place the embroidery piece wrong side up. Cover with a damp cloth. With a moderately hot iron press heavily. Remove the damp cloth and iron until dry. Turn work, and on right side iron only the hems.

FRAMES . . . There are several types of embroidery frames. The hand frames are most commonly used. They can be bought at a very low cost and are made in two shapes, round and oval. When frames are adjusted over a small area of the work, the material is held taut and the work cannot pucker. Larger frames for larger pieces are also available and may be adjusted for almost any size or type of embroidery.

We’ve provided a print out of the most basic embroidery stitches here:  Important Embroidery Stitches

You’ll also find several good videos demonstrating how to do the stitches on YouTube.  Just search ’embroidery stitches by hand’ and you’ll find more than enough to choose from.  Here’s a video tutorial of basic stitches to get you started.

TRANSFERRING . . . The patterns will need to be transferred onto your fabric.  Once you’ve printed them out there are several options you can choose from.  Some are:

A light table or sunny window where you tape the design down then trace it lightly onto your fabric.

Good old carbon paper, but this may smudge on your fabric.

A sewing tracing wheel and paper.

Some craft stores carry iron on transfer material you can run through your printer.

PATTERNS . . . The first pattern is from the 1800s and is a delicate floral design for a collar and cuff. With this pattern you’ll be able to pick and choose the colors you’d like to use and make it your own.  Embellishing a little girl’s dress or the corner of a hankie would be very pretty.

The next is from the early 1900s and is a beautiful Yellow Chrysanthemum Pattern.  Along with the colored picture is the detail of stitch directions and color placing.  There’s a diagram of shades, but the coordinating numbers for the silk thread are probably no longer available, so you’ll have to choose your own.

Here’s a pretty page of cross stitch embroidery patterns.  This is in color so you can match the thread accordingly.  The size of your design will be determined by what size your even weave fabric is.

We hope you enjoy these patterns and celebrating National Embroidery Month with us.  The VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) members have many embroidery items available right now .

Enjoy!

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.  Please share your favorite type of embroidery, hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.