1930s Depression Era Merry-Go-Round Scrap Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Who doesn’t love a Merry-Go-Round……..

merry go round quilt patternI found another great quilt pattern in my 1930’s quilting scrapbook called The Merry-Go-Round. This one was published in the Kansas City Star by McKim Studios in 1930. This 1930’s quilt pattern illustrates perfectly how the quilts of the depression era used “odd scraps” of fabric.

merry-go-round-quilt-block-vintage-crafts-and-more

Ruby McKim admonishes the maker that “each block can be a different color so long as the light and dark value remains the same.” So even when you’re using scraps from feedsacks, etc. pay attention to the color values of the fabrics.

The Merry-Go-Round is actually four blocks, all exactly alike, turned in different directions.

 

merry-go-round-quilt-block-templates-vintage-crafts-and-more

This particular Merry-Go-Round quilt pattern is different from many I found when searching the internet. Most used a hexagon pattern, the difference is this one uses half-square triangles.

Craftsy has a blog post that shows you How to Make 8 Half-Square Triangles at Once: The Magic 8 Method. This method would certainly speed up the making of this quilt.

Here’s another good tutorial on creating half-square triangles faster and easier at the Diary of a Quilter blog, Half-square-triangle short-cuts and easy square-up.

In this YouTube video by Jenny Doan of the Missouri Quilt Company she demonstrates a modern and easy way to sew a Merry-Go-Round Quilt.

For more information on quilt designer Ruby McKim, another of her patterns and more links on sewing half-square triangles, check out this previous blog post, Summer is Sailing Away – Sail Boat Quilt Block.

To print or save this pattern, right click on it, it will open in another window and there you can print or save it using your computer’s browser. There is also a green Print Friendly button at the bottom of the post.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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1800’s Child’s Pinafore Dress Sewing Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie will take us back to sewing in the 1800’s. Unlike the wonderful sewing patterns we have today, the patterns used in the 19th century were diagrams in magazines such as Peterson’s or Godey’s Ladies.

This is a dainty pinafore dress for a child. The material suggested to sew this pretty pinafore is Mull Muslin, Diaper or Holland.  Each of these is a thin plainwoven, opaque linen or cotton fabric. 

Childs Pinafore Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

The pattern pieces include back, front, side fronts, sleeve, shoulder and trimmings. Measurements are given in inches for each pattern piece. The dotted lines on the pattern pieces represent a fold. You’ll also notice letters and asterisks to match the pieces when sewing. The trimming is your choice and could be lace.

Antique Childs Pinafore Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

You’ll need to draw the pattern using the measurements noted. Probably on wrapping, freezer or shelf paper, taping portions together as necessary. The instructions below suggest using some old muslin rather than paper.

In a May 1877 Peterson’s Ladies Magazine volume an instruction on how to enlarge their diagrams was written. It’s assumed that most ladies of this day knew the fundamentals of sewing, but there must’ve been a few questions about copying the diagrams into a sewing pattern.

Enlarging our Diagrams - May 1877 Petersons Ladies Magazine

This explanation is included with the pattern in the PDF format file link below:

1800s Child’s Pinafore Sewing Pattern

To read a file in PDF format you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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Handbag Crochet Pattern – 1940s Jack Frost Straw Bag

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For today’s Freebie I’m thinking about Mother’s Day coming up soon. This is a 1940’s handbag crochet pattern from a Jack Frost Handbags booklet. The purses were made using Straw, Cordet, Soutache or Kordette, all were interchangeable and all are no longer available.

1940s Straw Bag 4814 Crochet Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

The pattern I’m sharing uses the Straw (3) 2-oz tubes and a size 4 crochet hook. In my research I’ve found that the yarns used for these patterns are cotton/rayon, strong and smooth. I found some Soutache, but I’m not sure if it is dense enough for the bag. I think some of this Premier Yarn Raffia may work for a replacement of the Straw required for this pattern.


This beautiful multi-color nylon crochet thread says it’s perfect for crocheting purses, totes, placemats and such, so it may work as well.

 

 

If you’re interested in using vintage patterns versus modern day patterns, this article on the KnittingGuru blog gives an excellent comparison and tips. The blogger, Veena Burry even uses one of the handbag patterns in the same booklet as an example. She points out that not only is some of the yarn required no longer available, the instructions themselves are much more vague than today’s instructions.

Many times I’ve done research to find a substitute (see above) for a vintage yarn that’s no longer available, only to find several different types that may work. Point is, using vintage patterns can be a lot of trial and error.

This article by Kristina Olson Designs, Makers, Vintage Patterns and Anonymous Designers besides talking about early women designers not receiving credit for their work, took a couple of vintage handbag patterns and made them her own, and even though they may not look exactly like the picture, it was her version of a wonderful vintage pattern.

Here’s the pattern straight from the booklet, I’ve rewritten it below:

1940s Straw Handbag Crochet Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More
CROCHET ABBREVIATIONS
ch . . . chain
sc . . . Single Crochet
st . . . Stitch
sts . . Stitches

STRAW BAG No. 4814
Jack Frost Straw – 3 2-oz. Tubes

Interchangeable with Cordet, Soutache or Kordette
Size 4 White Crochet Hook

Shell = (3 d c, ch 1, 3 d c) in next st

Ch 61. Skip first ch. Work 1 s c in each of the next 60 ch sts. Repeat for 12 rows, then work in pattern as follows:
Row 1: * Skip 2 s c; (3 d c, ch 1, 3 d c) in next st, skip 2 s c, 1 s c in next st; repeat from * across row (10 shell sts).
Row 2: Work a shell st in the s c of row below and 1 s c in the ch 1 of shell st below (11 shells).
Repeat above 2 rows for 18 rows.
Work a corresponding piece.
GUSSET: Ch 7, turn. Work 6 s c on ch. Work back and forth in s c for 29 inches. Join around 3 sides of bag with a row of s c. Fold in gusset at top. Sew the s c rows together at both sides. Fold down cuff. Insert zipper.

A note on the GUSSET, it says to work back and forth for 29 inches, but the number of inches may vary depending on the thickness of the thread or yarn you are using. The best thing to do is as you’re making the gusset, hold it against the length of the handbag’s sides and bottom to gauge the length needed.

The zipper can be inserted by sewing machine or by hand. It’s probably easiest to do it by hand. A fabric lining can be made for the inside of the purse by tracing around the bag on paper as a guideline, allowing for seams. Cut two fabric pieces for the front and back. Right sides together, sew around three sides, leave the top open. Fold the top edge over a quarter of an inch toward the wrong side, fold over again, then sew the edge down. Once your purse is assembled, insert the fabric liner and sew it in place.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Crochet Patterns Tartan Plaid Placemats and Potholders

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Highland Fling Tartan Pot Holders - Vintage Crafts and More (2)Highland Fling Tartan Placemat and Pot Holder Crochet Patterns

These patterns are in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on link, it will open in a new window and save or print.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Knitted Chair Back and Arm Pieces Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Knitting Chair Back and Arms Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Today’s pattern is a knitted chair back and arm pieces. Used to protect the chair’s upholstery from dirty heads and hands, I’ve seen several done in crochet but this is the first knitted pattern I’ve come across.

It’s a pretty pattern with fringe that would also look nice as a couch pillow.

Materials needed are Pearl Cotton Size 5 and a pair of Plastic Knitting Pins size No. 1 (2mm size).

Some of the abbreviations used for the pattern are below.

Knitting Abbreviations:
k……………knit
p……………purl
O……………thread or yarn over
tog………….together
p.s.s.o………pass sl st over k st
*(asterisk)….Repeat instructions following asterisk as many more times as specified, in addition to original.

Repeat instructions in parentheses as many times as specified. For example: “(K1, O, p 3) 4 times,” means to make whatever is in parentheses 4 times in all.

Knitted Chair Back and Arms Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

The one page PDF pattern is below:

Knitted Chair Back and Arms Pattern

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here. There are also free Adobe Reader Apps for mobile devices.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

1800s Peterson’s Ladies Magazine Christmas Purse Pattern

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Welcome to this week’s VTNS Fan Freebie Christmas in July vintage pattern!

This beautiful pattern for a Christmas Purse is torn out of an 1800’s Peterson’s Ladies Magazine. I have several loose pages I purchased several years ago.

1800s Petersons Ladies Magazine Christmas Purse Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

This pretty purse caught my eye because of the lovely design and colors. It could be done in needlepoint, cross stitch or even beading.

Just click on the image to save and print or use the green Print Friendly button below the post.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

Using Tessellations as a Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

The definition of tessellations can become very technical and mathematical (see Tessellation on Wikipedia, wow!) , but for my purposes, I’m keeping it simple.

A tessellation is a shape used over and over again to form a pattern without any gaps and no overlapping. Another way of explaining tessellation is tiling.

Tessellations Martin Isaac Tile PatternsTile Patterns © Photographer: Martin Isaac

Actually, many quilt patterns are tessellations. Fitting fabric together like a puzzle, not overlapping and no gaps. Eveline Foland used an hour glass shape as a tessellation in her Friendship Quilt from 1930.

She explains that this is a very old, quaint pattern, easy to piece and works up quickly. It’s called a friendship quilt because you ask your friends for pieces from the their favorite sewn dresses or pretty children’s prints.

A straight edge can be achieved by cutting the pieces in half. But the curved edge is pretty and can be bound with a colored braid.

 

Tessellations Quilt Pattern Hour Glass  - Vintage Crafts and More

By fitting the fabric pieces together, in this example each piece of fabric is different, you begin to form your quilt.

On Susan Dague Quilts website, she refers to them as Solving the Puzzles. She has several great examples of using tessellations in quilts.

Marti Mitchell, a well-known quilt teacher, has a Multi-Size Tessellating Windmill Tool that is a clear acrylic template with markings for eight different sizes. There’s a 15 minute video quilting tutorial, Tessellating Windmills and Leap Frog Method on her website explaining how to use it. Plus she offers a PDF hand out for the pattern.

The American Quilter’s Society website has a free pattern for Jery Auty’s Tessellating Hearts Quilt.

Here’s the full page for the 1930’s Friendship Quilt pattern:

Tessellations Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Just click on the image to print or use the green Print Friendly button below the post.

Enjoy!

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Edge in Petal or Cluny Tatting – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

 

 


Have you ever seen a beautiful piece of Cluny lace?

Cluny lace has long pointed tallies called wheat ears and is a geometric style of bobbin lace.

 

 

 

With today’s freebie you can get the same look without twisting lengths of thread on a bobbin. Instead there’s a technique called Petal or Cluny Tatting that can give you the same effect.

 

Petal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

 

The work is done with a shuttle and ball. It’s not easy, but by taking a look at the tutorial links below and practice, you can probably come up with a pretty Petal Tatting edge.

 

Petal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern Illustration 1 - Vintage Crafts and MorePetal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern Illustration 2 - Vintage Crafts and More

There are many places on the internet with tutorials on Petal or Cluny tatting. Here are a few:

Tatting a Cluny Leaf A YouTube video by tatmantats

Tatting Cluny Leaves by Hand A Needle Tatter’s Version

Hanging Cluny Leaf Flower Pattern and process by Tim TenClay

Also, in my research on Cluny Tatting, I found a super website by Georgia Seitz aka AKTATTER called Hanging the Cluny. She has a great page of information and links for making this pretty lace.

Here’s the pattern included in Aunt Ellen’s How-To Book on Needlework published in 1954.

Petal or Cluny Edge Tatting Pattern Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

To print the pattern  or any other photo on the post, click on it, it will open in a new window, go to file, print and you’ll have a printed copy of the page.

Also at the bottom of the post there is a green Print Friendly button that will give you several options to print and save.

Find more about Tatting and how to do it in this previous post, Tatting Instructions.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Bell Potholders Vintage Crochet Pattern for Christmas

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Decorate your kitchen for the holidays with these bell potholders.  The pattern is from a vintage Lily Design Book.

Bells Potholder Crochet Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Pocket Potholders

These become pocket potholders by sewing the two halves together. These bell potholders use red, tea rose and green. The material they’re made of is Lily Cotton Yarn and crochet hooks in size No. 0 (zero) and 5.

PDF file for download

Jingle Bells Potholder Crochet Pattern PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Cross Stitch Alphabet Chart for Monograms – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

This set of Cross Stitch monograms will be useful for personalizing gifts.

They can be made any size, depending on the size of the cross stitch. To make the letters larger or smaller, redraw in squares to desired size.

The position of the stitches may be marked on the fabric, or if threads of fabric are pronounced, stitches may be made by following threads without marking.

Cross Stitch Monograms - Vintage Crafts and More

Simply click on the chart, it will open in another window so you can save or print it. If you’d rather download the chart for later, the pdf file is below:

Cross Stitch Monogram Sheet

The pattern sheet is in pdf format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!