The Secret Drawer Quilt Block Pattern

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Do you have a secret drawer?

Hidden compartments that hold old love letters, jewelry, coins and important papers. Check out this wonderful Wooten’s Patent King of Desks that you know must have a couple of secret drawers.

Wootens Patent Cabinet Office Secretary Desk

The Secret Drawer

That brings me to today’s freebie The Secret Drawer quilt pattern. A 12-inch square block that uses light and dark plain and patterned fabric. It’s very similar to the Spool Block.

The Secret Drawer Quilt Pattern

As a matter of fact, you can see the spools surrounding the patterned centers in the sample. Eveline Foland designed this pattern for a 1930 issue of the Kansas City Star newspaper.

The Secret Drawer Eveline Foland Quilt Pattern
Download Instructions: Right-Click the image and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Links to more Secret Drawers

The Early Women Masters website has a colorful diagram of the Secret Drawer quilt block pattern and a couple of paragraphs of information about it here: Antique Geometric Quilt Designs – Secret Drawer.

It is also one of many quilt blocks included in the Quilt Index dot Org website. They have the same image of the newspaper pattern I’ve shared. It’s a bit cleaner though, because it hasn’t been glued into a scrapbook.

Interesting….

Alias-Grace-Novel-Margaret-Atwood
One of the most interesting things I came across while researching this quilt block is the crime novel Alias Grace: A Novel by Margaret Atwood. In 1843, a 16-year-old housemaid named Grace Marks was found guilty for the murder of her employer and two others.

 

 

It was a sensational trial for the time and made headlines around the world. The story of Grace Marks is true, but the novel is fictional and depicts what might have happened during her incarceration. An added bonus is the novel will soon be a Netflix Original Series.

I haven’t read the book so I don’t know how it relates to the Secret Drawer quilt pattern, but I found a WordPress blog that goes by the name The Quilts of Alias Grace, A Canadian girl’s journey of stitching through Margaret Atwood’s fiction.

According to the author of this blog, the book has a lot about textiles. The writer named the chapters of the book after quilts and includes sketches. The doctors ask Grace questions about the patterns and their meanings of the quilts she’s working on. The book is about Grace, but in it she surrounds herself with quilts and fabric.

The author of the blog takes you along as she tackles the difficult piecing of the Secret Drawer block and a blog post titled Secret Drawer Has Stumped Me.

 

 

Vintage Block Quilt AlongCharise Creates Vintage Block Quilt Along

In a Vintage Block Quilt Along, Charise Creates One Stitch At A Time has a great tutorial for the quilt block you can follow along with. Craftsy has Charise Creates Secret Drawer block pattern download for free.

 

 

One Little Block Pattern

Well, I didn’t expect to find out all this information from one little pattern, but here it is. Have you read Alias Grace: A Novel? Have you sewn a Secret Drawer block? Let us know by visiting our Facebook Fan Page.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

1930s Depression Era Merry-Go-Round Scrap Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Who doesn’t love a Merry-Go-Round……..

merry go round quilt patternI found another great quilt pattern in my 1930’s quilting scrapbook called The Merry-Go-Round. This one was published in the Kansas City Star by McKim Studios in 1930. This 1930’s quilt pattern illustrates perfectly how the quilts of the depression era used “odd scraps” of fabric.

merry-go-round-quilt-block-vintage-crafts-and-more

Ruby McKim admonishes the maker that “each block can be a different color so long as the light and dark value remains the same.” So even when you’re using scraps from feedsacks, etc. pay attention to the color values of the fabrics.

The Merry-Go-Round is actually four blocks, all exactly alike, turned in different directions.

 

merry-go-round-quilt-block-templates-vintage-crafts-and-more

This particular Merry-Go-Round quilt pattern is different from many I found when searching the internet. Most used a hexagon pattern, the difference is this one uses half-square triangles.

Craftsy has a blog post that shows you How to Make 8 Half-Square Triangles at Once: The Magic 8 Method. This method would certainly speed up the making of this quilt.

Here’s another good tutorial on creating half-square triangles faster and easier at the Diary of a Quilter blog, Half-square-triangle short-cuts and easy square-up.

In this YouTube video by Jenny Doan of the Missouri Quilt Company she demonstrates a modern and easy way to sew a Merry-Go-Round Quilt.

For more information on quilt designer Ruby McKim, another of her patterns and more links on sewing half-square triangles, check out this previous blog post, Summer is Sailing Away – Sail Boat Quilt Block.

To print or save this pattern, right click on it, it will open in another window and there you can print or save it using your computer’s browser. There is also a green Print Friendly button at the bottom of the post.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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1930s Magnolia Bud Kansas City Star Quilt Pattern

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One thing I love about living in the South in America is the beautiful Magnolia trees. Their big, glossy green leaves and the wonderful large, white and pink flowers when they’re full and open are something to behold.

Magnolia Bud - Vintage Crafts and More

Today’s freebie is a Magnolia Bud quilt pattern from the 1930’s. The designer is Eveline Foland who created many quilt patterns for the Kansas City Star Newspaper.

 

Magnolia Bud Eveline Foland Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

 

There are many variations of the Magnolia Bud, but Eveline calls this one a conventional version. She suggests using rose and pink on a light background. The blocks are set diagonally and may be alternated with a plain block in the quilt.

Remember to allow for seams when cutting out your templates for this pattern. Normally a quarter inch.

To use the pattern, simply click on it to open in another window, then save or print.

If you’re interested in 1930’s era quilts, Martingale’s Stitch This! website has an article on 1930’s Quilts for Today’s Quilters which has examples of several different quilt patterns used during that time period.

You might also like to take a look at this book available on Amazon: The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them, which not only includes 1930’s quilt blocks but letters from Farm Women during that time.

Enjoy!

 

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Using Tessellations as a Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

The definition of tessellations can become very technical and mathematical (see Tessellation on Wikipedia, wow!) , but for my purposes, I’m keeping it simple.

A tessellation is a shape used over and over again to form a pattern without any gaps and no overlapping. Another way of explaining tessellation is tiling.

Tessellations Martin Isaac Tile PatternsTile Patterns © Photographer: Martin Isaac

Actually, many quilt patterns are tessellations. Fitting fabric together like a puzzle, not overlapping and no gaps. Eveline Foland used an hour glass shape as a tessellation in her Friendship Quilt from 1930.

She explains that this is a very old, quaint pattern, easy to piece and works up quickly. It’s called a friendship quilt because you ask your friends for pieces from the their favorite sewn dresses or pretty children’s prints.

A straight edge can be achieved by cutting the pieces in half. But the curved edge is pretty and can be bound with a colored braid.

 

Tessellations Quilt Pattern Hour Glass  - Vintage Crafts and More

By fitting the fabric pieces together, in this example each piece of fabric is different, you begin to form your quilt.

On Susan Dague Quilts website, she refers to them as Solving the Puzzles. She has several great examples of using tessellations in quilts.

Marti Mitchell, a well-known quilt teacher, has a Multi-Size Tessellating Windmill Tool that is a clear acrylic template with markings for eight different sizes. There’s a 15 minute video quilting tutorial, Tessellating Windmills and Leap Frog Method on her website explaining how to use it. Plus she offers a PDF hand out for the pattern.

The American Quilter’s Society website has a free pattern for Jery Auty’s Tessellating Hearts Quilt.

Here’s the full page for the 1930’s Friendship Quilt pattern:

Tessellations Quilt Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

Just click on the image to print or use the green Print Friendly button below the post.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Summertime June Butterfly Quilt Pattern – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

It never ceases to amaze me what I find when I turn to my 1930’s quilt scrapbook. Today I’m celebrating Summertime with a pretty 1931 June Butterfly quilt pattern by Eveline Foland.

Vintage Crafts and More - June Butterfly Sample Quilt Block

The paragraphs included with the quilt pattern pieces say it all:

“A butterfly has lighted on the quilters’ block! If pretty figured prints in gay colors are used for the four pieces marked “dark”, and all different colored plain fabrics for the butterfly, which is appliqued on each block after it is pieced, this will make a particularly pretty piece of quilting.

This combination of patchwork and applique is the kind of block that will appeal to the woman who is looking for something different.

Allow very narrow seams, especially on the butterfly, and cut plain blocks seven and a half inches square, which is the size of the block, to go between. This will make a pretty pillow top, too, if more plain material is added outside the block. “

Kansas City Star June Butterfly Quilt Pattern PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

 

Vintage Crafts and More - Kansas City Star June Butterfly Quilt Pattern

If you have any quilting you’ve done that you’d like to share, please be sure to visit the VTNS Fanpage, we’d love to see your work.

Enjoy!

Silver and Gold Quilt Pattern – VTNS Fan Freebie

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

One of my very favorite songs to listen to during the Christmas season is ‘Silver and Gold‘ sung by Burl Ives from the TV special Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer.  It just wouldn’t be Christmas without it, so even though the holidays are over, when I came across this fun star quilt pattern called “Silver and Gold” in my 1930s scrapbook, I just had to share it.

The great thing about this particular quilt pattern is the ability to use two or three colors of your choice. Valentine’s Day and Mardi Gras aren’t too far away. This pattern would look great in red and white for Valentine’s or purple, green and gold for a Mardi Gras quilt or pillow.

This is a 1931 Kansas City Star quilt pattern designed by Eveline Foland. I’ve done several posts of different quilt designs, you can find them here or by clicking on the Quilting category in the right side panel of this post.

Vintage Crafts and More - Silver and Gold Quilt Pattern Kansas City StarThis is the write up included with the pattern:

“Here is a pretty quilt pattern “silver and Gold” with which to start your patchwork in 1931. It may be developed in either two or three colors, the third color being the eight light triangles that surround the star.

This gives an entirely different effect than when but two colors are used. Of course, gold is the predominating color, but any pretty color combination may be used.

Great care must be taken that the points come together perfectly in the center. The finished block is ten and a fourth inches square. Allow for narrow seams.”Vintage Crafts and More - Silver and Gold Quilt Pattern Eveline Foland 1931To print or save this pattern, click on it, it will then open in a new window so you can right click and save or print. You can also use the green Print It button below to print out the whole post. Unfortunately, there is some glue showing through at the bottom of the pattern where it was pasted into the quilting scrapbook, but the pattern pieces are just fine.

Enjoy!

Free Vintage Quilt Pattern Basket of Lilies for Easter

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie is a favorite quilt pattern from my vintage quilting scrapbook. This pretty Basket of Lilies designed by Eveline Foland was done back in 1931 for the Kansas City Star Newspaper. It’s really a classic and lovely pattern for any time of the year.

Vintage Crafts and More - Basket of Lilies Quilt Pattern

For another Eveline Foland quilt pattern and information on my vintage quilting scrapbook, check out this post.

Basket of Lilies Quilt Pattern PDF

If you have any quilts that you’d like to share, please be sure to visit our VTNS Facebook Fanpage, we’d love to see your work.

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Summer is Sailing Away – Sail Boat Quilt Block

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

This is the last week of August. Summer is sailing away and along that same line we are sharing a 1930 quilt pattern called the Sail Boat Block from McKim Studios. Ruby McKim was a talented quilt designer during this era and her designs are still sought after by quilters today.

Vintage Crafts and More - Sail Boat Quilt Block PatternRather than a more intricate patterned block, this one is simple and can be easily pieced together. This would be a sweet quilt for a little boy or a covering for a beautiful brass bed at a cabin by the lake.

This design uses all triangles. Making triangles can be intimidating to math challenged people such as myself, but I’ve found a couple places on the internet that will help you out with these quilt pieces.

From the website Patchwork-and-Quilting.com there are two articles I found helpful in making half-square triangles:

How To Make Grid Pieced Half Square Triangle Units

Calculating the Cutting Size of Quick Pieced Half Square Triangles

If you find it easier to watch someone do this rather than read how to do it, here’s a short video explaining How to Make Half Square Triangles that shows you how to create and sew a basic half-square triangle unit. There’s a short sponsored ad at the beginning.

We’ve shared other Kansas City Star quilt patterns before on this blog, you can find them here or click on the “Quilting” category on the right hand side.

If you have any quilting you’ve done that you’d like to share, please be sure to hop on over to our VTNS Fanpage, we’d love to see your work.

Here is your free Sail Boat Quilt Pattern made with triangles:

Sail Boat Quilt Block Pattern

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Kansas City Star Friday the 13th Quilt Pattern

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Welcome to our VTNS Fan Freebie Friday the 13th!

According to folklorists, there is no written evidence for a “Friday the 13th” superstition before the 19th century.  Many theories have been proposed about the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition.

One theory says it puts together two older superstitions: that thirteen is an unlucky number and that Friday is an unlucky day.  I have to admit, I don’t like using the number 13, but Friday the 13th has never been a problem for me. Really just another day.

Are you one of the 10 percent of modern day Americans that believe Friday the 13th is an unlucky day? Many of us just joke about it or maybe we’re a little more cautious than usual. There are three in 2012, one was in January, there’s today – April 13th and one more in July.  It can be a good excuse to celebrate in a fun way and some companies even use it as a sale day.

We want to make sure you have a lucky Friday the 13th so we’re sharing an interesting quilt pattern from the Kansas City Star Newspaper in 1935 appropriately called “Friday the 13th.”

Green County Barn Quilts Friday the 13th Barn Photo
I’ve found several variations of this quilt block that are all pretty similar.  I even came across this Friday the 13th Barn Quilt on the Green County Wisconsin Barn Quilts website.  Most of the blocks had the same 4-square on point in the middle and the same outside 4-corners but where I saw a difference is in the border between the two.

The quilt pattern from the Kansas City Star Newspaper starts out saying, “Don’t Let Your Superstitions Frighten You Away” and claiming in the paragraph below that although Friday the 13th is thought of as an unlucky day, by using the motif for this quilt it may “be one way to ward off the evil spirits.” Then goes on to tell us “when finished it is a colorful and extremely attractive” quilt.

Kansas City Star Newspaper Friday 13th Quilt Pattern Picture

I have to agree that this quilt block could be very colorful and attractive when you combine different fabrics in prints and solid colors. It goes together like a puzzle and would be very easy to manipulate into a pretty pattern through out your quilt.

With this pattern you have to allow for seams, the template pieces do not include the 1/4 inch seam allowance. There isn’t a measurement for the finished block, but based on the size of the templates I’d guess it’s around 11 to 12 inches.

We’ve shared other Kansas City Star Quilt Patterns before and you can find them here.

Enjoy this quilt block and have a lucky Friday the 13th!

Kansas City Star Friday the 13th Quilt Pattern PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link below and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.