Fancy Antique Alphabet Patterns for Embroidery Monograms

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Today’s freebie is a set of fancy alphabet letters you can use for embroidery or other crafting. Young embroiderers used the alphabets to practice their stitches and went on to use them to create samplers, quilts and other household items.

Antique A to Embroidery - Vintage Crafts and More

This is the A and the rest of the alphabet is just as pretty.  I believe this page was pulled from one of my Peterson’s Ladies Magazines. It’s certainly over 100 years old.

I’ve cleaned up the page, but haven’t gone over the outline of the letters so there may be some gaps here and there that you’ll have to fill in when you trace them.

You can find some diagrams of basic embroidery stitches in this earlier post of mine and Craftsy has a some very good photos and instructions of how to do 10 Hand Embroidery Stitches. These will help you get started.

 

Antique Alphabet to Embroidery - Vintage Crafts and More

To save or print the alphabet page above, simply click on it, it will open in another window where you can save or print it using your computer’s browser. You can also use the little green Print Friendly Button at the bottom of the post.

If you’d like to save it for later in PDF format, the link is below:

Antique Alphabet to Embroidery

The pattern sheet is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here. There are also free Adobe Reader Apps for mobile devices.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Bunny Rabbit Baby Bib Embroidery Design

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Bunny Rabbit Baby Bib - Vintage Crafts and More

This cute embroidered Bunny Baby Bib comes from a 1922 Star Needlework Journal. Published by the American Thread Company, each magazine is filled with wonderful needlework patterns for crochet, embroidery, knitting, tatting and lace making.

Bunny Rabbit Baby Bib Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More
The type of material required is not stated so you could use just about anything that can be easily embroidered and probably washable, if you’re going to be using it as a baby bib.

Enlarged, the design would make a nice quilted wall hanging.

The project uses American Thread Company’s “Silkline” Art Thread and Crochet Cotton.

Article 50 – Silkline Art Thread is “an embroidery cotton of excellent brilliancy in a most artistic line of shades. The strands may be easily separated.” It comes in six strands, skeins in white and colors.

Since American Thread Company has been out of business for a long time, I don’t have a color conversion chart for the numbers used with the design so the choice of coloring would be yours.

Most of the outline stitch is worked using black for the head and red for the remainder of the design.

The Article 30 – Silkline Crochet Cotton is “smoothly spun and perfectly twisted as to give to the finished work a distinctive “lacey” feel.”

The crochet cotton is used around the edge of the bib. You’ll see at the bottom of the instructions a s c (single crochet) and p (picot) in a row to finish the edge. You’ll find a handy how-to page on this blog post for these and other crochet stitches.

Below is the PDF file link to download for later:

Bunny Rabbit Baby Bib Embroidery Design

To read the one page PDF file, you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here. There are also free Adobe Reader Apps for mobile devices.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

Beginning Guide to Hardanger Embroidery Stitches

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Who doesn’t love those heirloom baby and wedding items made using Hardanger embroidery? So dainty and beautiful, and if you know how to do a satin stitch, really not that hard to do.

Hardanger embroidery or “Hardangersøm” is a form of embroidery traditionally worked with thread on even-weave cloth, using counted thread and drawn thread work techniques.

Hardanger got it’s name from the women of the Town of Hardanger in Norway who were experts in this type of embroidery. Although the modern form of the work originated in Norway, the same stitches can be found on the wonderful embroideries of ancient Persia and Asia.

Equipment for Hardanger embroidery work is simple, consisting of very sharp pointed scissors, embroidery thread and crewel needles. The material is woven with a square, even mesh.

All outlining or Kloster stitch blocks are done before cutting the threads for drawnwork. It’s best to do the large spaces first, working down to the smaller details.

Heavier thread is usually used for the Kloster or Satin Stiches and the finer thread for weaving and filling in stitches.

Kloster stitch is generally worked over four threads and there are always five stitches for each single block, with four stitches added for each consecutive block.

Stitches of Hardanger Embroidery Illus 3 - Vintage Crafts and MoreStitches of Hardanger Embroidery Illus 4 - Vintage Crafts and MoreSatin stitch is only worked over less than four threads when it is not depended upon as an outline for cut work.

To add Picots to the bars, work half way down, take the end of thread attached to work and twist it around the needle three times, hold in place and draw the needle through, pulling the thread tight and finish weaving the bar.

Below is an example of using the Kloster stitch over eight threads. Note that the center five stitches are worked over eight threads with four stitches on either side to give balance.

Stitches of Hardanger Embroidery Illus 5 - Vintage Crafts and MoreAnother form of Kloster stitch is illustrated here:

Stitches of Hardanger Embroidery Illus 1 - Vintage Crafts and More

These stitches are not used as an edge for cut work, but as a decorative stitch on the material.

There are several ways of forming corners. In the illustration below, the first two are used to form straight edges on either side of a Hardanger design. It’s simply a choice as to whether a mitered or diagonal corner is used, since they are usually a decorative stitch. The buttonhole edge and corner adds strength for use with a cut away design.

Stitches of Hardanger Embroidery Illus 2 - Vintage Crafts and More

This 4½ minute video on YouTube, Beginning Hardanger explains visually how to begin Hardanger embroidery.

The PDF file you can download for later is an article, Fundamental Stitches of Hardanger Embroidery that comes from a 1920’s Star Needlework Journal magazine.

Stitches of Hardanger Embroidery PDF

The article is in pdf format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

Swedish Weaving Guest Towel Pattern – Fan Freebie Friday

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Are you having company this summer? Whether it’s family or friends, this Swedish Weaving pattern done on colorful Guest Towels will impress.

Start with an even weave fabric towel and follow the simple diagram. Check out this earlier post for information on How to do Swedish Embroidery.

In this pattern Huck Toweling is used because the weave has small raised loops which occur at regular intervals, and these are used for darning the designs.

Vintage Crafts and More - Swedish Weaving Guest Towel

If you’ve done any embroidery that you’d like to share, please be sure to stop by our VTNS Fanpage, we’d love to see your work.

Swedish Weaving Guest Towel Pattern PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

Borders Made from Basic Embroidery Stitches

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

With Mother’s Day approaching we thought sharing some basic embroidery stitches for borders may come in handy. These embroidered borders can be used to embellish a hankie, blouse or towel to give as a gift.

Borders Made from Basic Stitches

Below are a couple of how-to pages on embroidery stitches that may give you more ideas for borders or embellishments you can add to items for gift giving:

Vintage Crafts and More Embroidery Stitches How ToVintage Crafts and More Embroidery Stitches How To 2

Here is the image of the Border Stitches page and it can also be found as a PDF file if you’d like to download a copy.

Vintage Crafts and More Borders Made with Basic Embroidery StitchesAll the pages shown can be enlarged for better viewing once opened in another window or right clicked and saved to your computer.

Borders Made From Basic Embroidery Stitches PDF

The pattern page is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

Home Needlework Magazine Vintage Cross Stitch Patterns

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

On a theme of baskets, since we’re so close to Easter, I found a couple of vintage cross stitch patterns to share from a 1914 Home Needlework Magazine.

Vintage Crafts and More - 1914 Home Needlework Magazine Cover

This is a terrific little magazine that is full of embroidery, crochet and knitting patterns. The article is titled, Cross Stitch Designs for Household Articles.

A couple samples of the finished designs:

Vintage Crafts and More - Cross Stitch Flower Basket PatternVintage Crafts and More - Cross Stitch Wreath PictureVintage Crafts and More - Cross Stitch Basket Pattern

The article describes using these motifs on different types of linens. For fabric that doesn’t have an even weave it explains how to use waste canvas. This website has a post that explains what waste canvas is and how to stitch with it. It’s a better explanation than the one below from 1914.

Cross Stitch Pattern Symbol Chart

A color symbol chart for the designs is included. You may substitute other colors according to your own preferences. The article suggests using three threads of stranded cotton for cross stitching.

Cross Stitch Pattern Symbol Chart

Paragraphs that Accompany the Designs

One great beauty and advantage in these motifs is that they may be adapted and applied to different articles in different ways. By counting the squares, the design can be worked out on any regular weave material, such as canvas, where a prominent thread marks off regular squares. One should count these squares and the number of rows of symbols before commencing the work, in order to determine the exact position of the motifs.

Cross Stitch Pattern Flower BasketCross Stitch Pattern WreathCross Stitch Pattern Rose Basket

Any of these designs may be carried out on plain material, by the use of Penelope canvas or scrim (a light weight gauzy material). The latter being more pliable will require special care to see that the threads are perfectly straight, so that the crosses will be even.

Place the canvas or scrim over the surface where the design is to be worked, and baste carefully in place. The stitches are taken through both material and canvas, working between and not into the threads of the latter, leaving them perfectly free to be drawn out after the work is completed.

Cross Stitch Pattern Cornucopia

The cornucopia design can be used for various purposes. Perhaps the most suitable would be for a towel or scarf, making a border of the motifs along the end. Instead of using a scallop, the ends might be hemstitched, and this, by a great many is preferred on an article which is to be frequently laundered. Cross Stitch Rose Wreath

Saving the Designs

Each motif can be individually clicked on and printed or saved (right click, save image as). The print out of each is large, half of an 8 x 10 inch piece of paper, if you don’t make any size adjustments to your printer settings. I experimented with a couple of the size settings and the 3.5 x 5 inch was nice. Not too small, easy to see to copy and a good size for a motif on a towel or table linen.

PDF Scan of the Full Article

You can also download and save the whole 3 page article with the file below:

Cross Stitch Patterns PDF

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

1908 Home Needlework Magazine Article – Beginner’s Guide on How to Embroider Holly – VTNS Fan Freebie Friday

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie! During the holiday season, all over the world branches of bright green holly with pretty red berries adorn our homes as a decoration. This week’s freebie will show you how to embellish an item with embroidered holly.

Vintage Crafts and More - How to Embroider Holly

The lesson is from a 1908 edition of the Home Needlework Magazine. This women’s magazine was devoted to the art of needlework, embroidery and lace making and touted that it was an authority on home decoration, dress embroidery and things fashionable.

Part of the lesson consists of the importance of shading and the colors used for the motif. The article suggests using 3 shades of red for the berries, one deep, one medium and one very light, maybe even pink.

Also discussed is using the correct slant of the stitches to make your embroidery look realistic. Silk embroidery threads are used, which was customary in the early 1900s designs.

Even a beginner can follow this lesson and use the techniques taught to embellish a doily, napkins or a tablecloth for the holidays.

1908 Home Needlework Magazine Article – How to Embroider Holly

The actual holly pattern is not included with the lesson, because in the magazine you could order the doily already printed with the design. A quick search on the internet will bring up many free downloadable prints you could use.

Here are a couple to get you started, but I’m sure you’ll find many more. This free download of a holly graphic even shows shading that may be helpful when doing the embroidery.

From Mary Cobert’s Needle ‘n Thread site, a hand embroidery PDF pattern for Boughs of Holly that would fit nicely in a corner of a napkin or table topper.

And last but not least, Why do we decorate with holly? This interesting article from TLC Family tells us.

Enjoy!

Note: The lesson is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Vintage Colonial Woman Free Embroidery Transfer Pattern – VTNS Fan Freebie Friday

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to the VTNS Fan Freebie Friday pattern!

Today we are sharing some information on a tried and true needlework art form that’s been around a long time, embroidery transfers. Some even dating back to the 16th century. Examples of ancient transfers can be found on the Internet and are great for use on historical clothing. This article about Historical Embroidery on Mary Corbet’s Needle ‘n Thread page goes into detail about it.

When you think of iron-on transfers there are several companies that come to mind right away, Aunt Martha’s, Workbasket, Vogart and there were many more that have come and gone.Vintage Crafts and More Vogart Pillowcase Embroidery Transfers

Vogart did many of the Days of the Week transfers and pillowcase motifs. It’s no longer in business. In 1990 they filed for bankruptcy and some of their assets were taken over my other companies. You can find out more about the history of Vogart in this article.

 

Vintage Crafts and More Workbasket Transfers
Workbasket magazines included an impressive fold out page of transfers in each issue. If you’ve been looking for a certain pattern that was in a Workbasket magazine, but can’t remember what issue you saw it in, this extensive search able database will help you find it. A lot of hard work went into this Workbasket Magazine Table of Contents.

Vintage Crafts and More Aunt Marthas Embroidery Transfers Peacock

 

 

Aunt Martha’s is still making transfers, although many of the older designs have been retired, making the vintage transfers a fun find. Colonial Patterns manufactures the new designs under Aunt Martha’s that can be found today.

 

 

Vintage Crafts and More Butterick Embroidery Tranfers 1920s
Many of the large sewing companies also offered and are still offering transfers. Butterick especially has some nice transfers I’ve seen from the 1920s.

Before the 1950s many transfers were perforated patterns rather than iron-on. Perforated patterns required that a powder be forced through the tiny holes on the patterns. Those that have a raised ink design are called Numo transfers and were meant to be used only once. The red flat ink transfer, like Workbasket, could be carefully used several times.

In an earlier article on this blog about transfers you’ll find a link on how to transfer the free patterns we’ve shared called the Five Methods for Marking an Embroidery Pattern on Fabric.

To see embroidery transfer items our VTNS members have a available now click here.

If you embroider any of the free transfer patterns or one of your own, please share them on the VTNS Facebook Fanpage.

Now for today’s download. One I’m sure you’ve seen before. The Colonial Woman, Lady or Girl comes in many different variations and was used many times as a pillow case edge along with some crochet. This one has floral detail and she’s in a beautiful dress and hat:

Colonial Woman Embroidery Transfer Pattern with Floral Detail

Enjoy!

The pattern is in PDF format so to download it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Make Your Own Designs – Antique Floral Embroidery Patterns

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Welcome to the VTNS Fan Freebie Friday! Today we’re providing a couple pages of pretty flower embroidery patterns from 1917.

The delightful art of embroidery has been taught to young women for ages. Most items are done using already made patterns that although beautiful and eye-catching leave no room for using your own imagination. If you’re interested in making your own designs, with the patterns provided today you’ll be able to do that.

By arranging and transferring the flower patterns onto your fabric of choice you can come up with your very own design. They can be as intricate or as simple as you’d like. From something like the sample below to using one flower to adorn the corner of a vintage hankie.

Make Your Own Designs - Antique Floral Embroidery PatternsYou’ll need to print out and then copy the patterns onto your fabric. Here is a good article on About.com on Five Methods for Marking an Embroidery Pattern on Fabric.

Your choice of material will depend on the item you’d like to make and embroider. Whether it is for every day use or a pretty bonnet for a baby.  You can find many ‘ready to embroidery’ items available today or use a vintage item you’ve found.

To use these patterns you will need at least an elementary knowledge of embroidery stitches, but they aren’t too complicated that you wouldn’t be able to quickly learn how to do them.

There are many places on the internet that feature a how-to on stitches as-well-as YouTube videos you can watch and follow along as the person makes the stitch. Just do an internet search on the stitch you’d like to learn more about. In an earlier blog post we discussed some Important Embroidery Stitches.

Some of the stitches you’ll need to know are: Daisy, French Knots, Buttonhole, Chain or Stem, Satin, Coral or Feather, Double Back, Romanian or Fish-Bone, and Fern.

The instructions will point out the best stitch to use for each flower. The color of the embroidery thread and whether it is cotton or silk, is up to you.

So have fun and let us know what you come up with by sharing it on the VTNS Facebook Fanpage.

Here are the pages to download:

Antique Embroidery Flower Patterns and Instructions

You’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer to read the pdfs. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link above and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.


Enjoy!

Mexican Drawn Thread Work Instructions and Patterns

Share with your friends...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pagePin on PinterestShare on Google+

Mexican Drawn Work

Recently Cinco de Mayo was celebrated and it reminded me of the beautiful Mexican Drawn Work embroidery I’ve seen.

Mexican Drawn Thread Work Patterns and Instructions

I didn’t find a lot of information on Mexican drawn thread work, but I have a book about it that was originally published in 1889 titled Fifty Designs for Mexican Drawn Work.

You can find a reproduced copy for sale on the internet and some original copies too. Below I share some of the instructions from this booklet.

 

 

Drawn Thread

The craft of drawn thread has been around a long time. It’s a kind of openwork on linen where you remove some of the threads from the base fabric then rearrange or decorate the remaining threads with stitchery.

This embroidery technique is especially for doilies, table and dresser scarfs, place mats and anywhere you might use a decorative cloth.

To choose the linen for your project look for a plain cloth that will be easy to draw. Make sure the threads are even and without lumps. The grade of linen you choose will depend on it’s use. A finer cloth for a baby’s pillowcase and a more durable cloth for an everyday table.

Use an eight or twenty weight crochet cotton for stitching. It’s best when the cotton is coarser than the woven threads of the fabric. A nice silk thread would give a nice effect as well.

A frame for your work is very important so that the item will be evenly and firmly stretched. A round embroidery ring in sizes three to eighteen inches in diameter would work too.

When the edge of the work is to be finished with a hem, the hem is usually hem-stitched.

Hemstitching

For information about hemstitching with this technique I’ve included the instructional PDF below:

Drawn Thread Work Hemstitching

Embroidery Stitches Used in Drawn Thread Work

Many of the stitches used in Mexican Drawn Thread Work are common embroidery stitches. The PDF below is 17 pages from an antique publication. The pages include instructions and illustrations for embroidery stitches used in drawn thread work.

Drawn Thread Work Stitches

Drawn Thread Work Small Table Cloth

A Tablecloth Pattern

As shown above, I’ve separated out and rewritten a small tablecloth pattern from the same publication. You’ll find it here:

Drawn Thread Work Small Table Cloth

Patterns for Edging

In addition to the tablecloth pattern, I found several edging patterns that you can use on tea towels, pillows and handkerchiefs.

Drawn Thread Work Edging Patterns

All in all this really is a fascinating type of embroidery that has many possibilities for use once you’ve mastered the basics.

PDF Download Instructions

You’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer to read the PDFs. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link below and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.