A Lesson on Hemstitching Drawn Thread Needlework

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Hemstitching

It’s a popular type of ornamental needlework where you arrange and group threads in different ways. Hemstitching is a type of openwork, the warp of threads are drawn from the fabric and then drawn together by various stitches that form open patterns.

 

A Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

 

By grouping and sewing the threads in different stitches you can make up many combinations of design. Hemstitching can be the sole decoration on the piece or can be combined with other types of embroidery.

For simple hemstitching, draw out threads above the edge of a hem that has been basted in to any desired width.

Then with a needle and thread cross and group the threads making decorative clusters.

 

 

Mexican Drawn Thread Work

This hemstitching is similar to Mexican Drawn Thread Work. Previously, I wrote a post on that. Find it here: Mexican Thread Drawn Work Instructions and Patterns

 

Lesson on Hemstitching

Lesson on Hemstitching

 

PDF file to download below

This is a two page PDF file of the pages above that explains what hemstitching is and has instructions and illustrations for doing drawn thread work.

Lesson on Hemstitching Needlework

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

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A Scholehouse For The Needle Book Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

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embroidery-sprigs-bug-vintage-crafts-and-moreThe embroidery sprigs found on this blog post are from the pattern book A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker published in 1632, but I found these examples in a book titled Embroidery edited by Mrs. Archibald H. Christie and published in 1909.

 

Embroidery Book

It is “A collection of articles on subjects connected with the study of fine needlework, including stitches, materials, methods of work, and designing, and history, with numerous illustrations and coloured plates of modern work.

Here are more embroidery books written and edited by Mrs. Grace Christie.

 

The book I used I found on Archive.org. You can choose from several different download options. I usually download the PDF file. It’s easy and fast, just remember where you save it so you can find it later. Most of the time I save mine to the desktop, then I move them to the proper file. Here’s the link:  Embroidery.

Samplers and Pattern Books

When you study collections of samplers from a long time ago, you’ll notice that they often have certain details in common. Such as a little cross stitch bird, baskets of fruit and flowers, borders and floral sprigs. That leads us to believe that the needleworkers of that time may have chosen elements for their designs from the same book of patterns.

Few of these pattern books survived in comparison to the great many that once existed, but it’s not surprising, since they were greatly used, often pricked through the print of the pattern and pounced through perforations onto the material. This way of making tracings, and sometimes pages being ripped out, most certainly hurt the books, making editions very hard to find.

History of Lace

For more information on old pattern books, Mrs. Bury Palliser’s History of Lace has an appendix with a long list of them with descriptive notes. You can find this book and many others at Archive.org.

There is a copy published in 1865 and also one that was published ten years later in 1875.  They are in several languages and cover the period of 1527 to 1784. Many of them concern lace, but some of the books have designs specially arranged for embroidery.

If you’d like a hard copy of History of Lace by Mrs. Bury Palliser, Dover Publishing has a reproduced copy available on Amazon. I did find a couple originals for sale, but they were $94 and up.

A Scholehouse For The Needle

One English book, which has special interest for embroiderers is A Scholehouse for the Needle by Richard Shorleyker printed in London in 1632. It’s a teaching book with patterns and examples with an emphasis on arranging your own designs.

For this reason even today this book is beneficial but hard to find. Doing a search for it, all I found were reproduced copies. Some of them costing hundreds of dollars. I didn’t see any originals available. One reproduced book on Etsy was $32 and ships from the United Kingdom.

I found several images of individual book pages available here and there on the internet when I did a Google search for them.

Seventeenth Century Embroidery Patterns

It’s interesting to see examples of seventeenth-century patterns. The sprigs are in rows in the book. You’ll find many similar designs on the embroidered clothing of that time period.

 

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs and Bug

A Scholehouse for the Needle Pattern Book Embroidery Sprigs

 

In addition to using the patterns individually, you can build up the designs by arranging them in groups.

Here’s an Example

A Scholehouse for the Needle embroidery sprigs design

The figure to the right used the rose like spray, second to last on the first row of designs, its repeated four times. The main stem radiating outward. You’ll find the detached sprig in the second row of designs at the end.

A frame surrounds it and shows how a design can develop into something new.

 

 

 

To print or save the images, click on them, they will open in a new window and there you can save or print them.

In addition to saving or printing them from this post, I’ve made a one sheet PDF file you can download below:

Embroidery Designs From A Scholehouse For The Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Armenian Edging Stitch Instructions from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine

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The article on the Armenian Edging Stitch in the 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine is titled One Makes This Lace With a Sewing Needle. There are instructions for three different designs. All of them start with a loop stitch across the material. Then by adding additional stitches you can build a pretty lace edge.

 

Armenian Edging Stitch Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle - Vintage Crafts and More

The instructions use a very fine crochet cotton to sew the edgings. A size 50 or 60 in white. Crochet cotton thread is sized by weight with each weight identified by a number. The lower the size number the thicker it is. The higher the crochet cotton’s weight number the finer the thread. So a Size 3 is heavier than a Size 10.

Armenian Edge Stitch - Vintage Crafts and More

Let’s Learn the Armenian Edging Stitch

Now you could try your hand at making an Armenian Edge Stitch following the directions above or I’ve found several blog tutorials and a YouTube video series that will help you master this stitch.

First of all, on the Artyfibres blog Sarah Whittle demonstrates stitches with step-by-step pictured tutorials. In her Stitch A-Z group she has a tutorial on the Armenian Edging Stitch. It’s very easy to follow as each pictured step has a number for your needle to follow.

Another well done tutorial is on the embroidery blog Kimberly Ouimet. She calls the Armenian Edge Stitch a Knot Stitch Edging and states that it is also known as Antwerp Stitch Edging.

Either way, it’s a good tutorial on this edging stitch. Her stitch looks very similar to a Blanket Stitch since she goes a little higher on the edge of the material. But again a very good tutorial with many pictures to break down each step in the stitch.

Last but not least is The Henry Art Gallery Embroidery Stitch Identification Guide.  There’s a diagram of the Armenian Edge Stitch as-well-as an Antwerp Edge. If you need to find a stitch this is a great site because all you have to do is click on the alphabetical Index of stitches.

The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work

This YouTube series has 8 parts on How to do Needle Lace, The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work. It’s really beautiful and it helps to see someone actually doing it.

In the comments the instructor, Ashley says there are very few if any books or patterns for this type of lace. She hopes that by doing these videos she encourages people to learn so there will be a renewed interest in this craft. If the comments on the videos are any indication, I’d say she is succeeding.

Scanned One Page PDF File

Armenian Edging Stitch – Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Embroidery Heart Applique Circle Medallion Design

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Embroidery Heart Medallion Design

Embroidery Heart Applique Design

Today’s embroidery heart applique freebie comes from a 1917 Embroidery Pattern Book. It was originally done in leather and stitched with coarse thread. The design is from shoes of the fifth to seventh centuries now preserved in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

This embroidery heart applique could be used on shoes again, especially if they were made of felt. For a modern take on the design, the applique could decorate a pillow, quilt, bag or ornament.

 

 

Applique

Applique is an ornamental needlework that takes designs cut from fabric that are then sewn onto a larger piece of fabric to form a picture. Today’s applique can be used in many applications such as machine embroidery, felt projects and quilting.

Fusible web

 

The use of paper backed fusible web has made applique easy for just about everyone. In Pat Sloan’s book Teach Me to Applique she shows you easy ways to create soft and simple applique projects using fusible techniques.

 

 

My first thought when I hear the word applique is quilting. Vintage quilts use many wonderful applique designs. Just to name a few: Rose of Sharon, Flower Basket, Butterfly, Sunbonnet Sue and all the Baltimore Album quilts.

PDF Pattern File to Download

Back to this pretty embroidery heart applique design. In the PDF file below is the pattern and a paragraph detailing the history of it.

Embroidery Heart Applique Design

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

1925 Star Needlework Journal Vintage Tea Apron Sewing Instructions

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A Vintage Tea Apron

Today’s vintage tea apron sewing pattern instructions are from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal magazine Volume 10 Number 1.  The American Thread Co. published the magazine quarterly. You could have a yearly subscription mailed to you for 40 cents or pay 10 cents for a single copy.

No Pattern, but Materials and Instructions

Actual pattern pieces are not included for this tea apron but instead there is a list of materials required and instructions for sewing. The photo is in black and white, but the true colors are yellow with a black lace trim. Very 1920’s.

A Tea Apron - Vintage Crafts and More

Embroidery Design

For embellishment an embroidery design is included. A simple but fun design to play with.

 

Apron embroidery design - Vintage Crafts and More

If you’d like to download the embroidery design, right click on the image to save it.

 

Just 3/4 yard of 36 inch yellow voile (soft, sheer fabric) material is used. 2¼ yards of black lace and 1¼ yards of ribbon for the tie.  The bottom of the apron has a curved shape. When complete the apron is 23 inches long and 27 inches wide. Try a stronger material or make it bigger, it could easily be done.

 

Apron Sewing Instructions - Vintage Crafts and More

A three inch hem is sewn at the top and the sides are shirred (technique that takes a regular piece of fabric and shrinks it up, giving it elasticity) shape. Two strands of black embroidery thread and a small running stitch make up the straight lines on the apron.

Shirring Tips

The Craftsy blog has a Shirring Tips for Beginners post that has some good pointers and Seamingly Smitten has a tutorial on How to Shir Fabric with elastic thread.

Does anyone have some ideas about sewing this apron, changing the size or shirring fabric, please let us know in the comments below.

Link to a Garden Apron

I’ve featured another apron to sew in a previous post you can use to gather garden fruits and vegetables. It also doesn’t have a pattern, only sewing instructions with an illustration.

Here’s the one page PDF file for the 1925 Tea Apron:

Star Needlework Journal – Tea Apron

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!


This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Cross Stitch Snowflakes or Border Embroidery Patterns

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

Today I’m posting a chart from an antique French embroidery design booklet. The charts are quick and easy cross stitch for what looks like snowflakes or designs that could be used as a border.

Imagine them scattered on a decorative pillow cover in red and white, blue and white or as a border on a towel or pillowcase.

old time cross stitch snowflakes - vintage crafts and more

Also a couple of the designs could be used with the craft of “chicken scratch” on gingham. If you’ve never heard of it, I’ve done a blog post about it titled Chicken Scratch Embroidery – What is it and how to do it.

Be sure to check out this previous blog post of the Alphabet in Cross Stitch for Monograms.

To Download Chart: Right-Click on the image and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can save or print it.


If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns. Please feel free to share your latest projects in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Briggs Embroidery Transfer Pattern Birds and Holly

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

William Briggs in the late 1800’s invented and received a patent for his hot iron embroider transfer. A special ink on paper that with a hot iron could be transferred to cloth.

We’ve come a long way since then, with many companies using this method and even pencils and pens for sale to make your own hot iron transfers on paper. Aunt Martha’s has a kit that includes the pencils and 50 sheets of 8 x 11 inch paper.

This gives you great freedom to do your own designs and transfer them to cloth to embroider using your favorite threads and stitches. One thing you have to be careful with using these Hot Iron Transfer Pens and Pencils is to embroider over all the marks because the design doesn’t wash out.

This blog post, Vintage Colonial Woman Embroidery Transfer goes into the different companies that have offered hot iron transfers through the years and has this link to a Workbasket Magazine Issues Table of Contents.

Here’s the design:

 

Briggs Embroidery Birds and Holly - Vintage Crafts and More

This particular embroidery pattern was taken from one of his catalogs in the late 1800’s. Since it’s from the catalog it’s not actual size. The sizes where listed on the page with design. When ordered they would come on the paper size listed.

This pattern was listed as 11 x 13 inches. The design I’ve scanned and cleaned up is approximately 8 x 8 inches. Since it’s in a JPEG format, once downloaded you can experiment with changing it’s size on your printer or in a photo editing software program. The PDF image size is smaller, about 6.5 x 6.5 inches.

Just click on it, it will open in a new window and there you can right click to save it to print, then trace onto fabric and embroider.

If you print directly from the image without saving it first, it will have to be reduced to about 70% on your printer, because when I tried it as is, it went over the page edges. If you save it first, then print from the file, you shouldn’t have any problem fitting it on a landscape orientation, 8.5  x 11 inch page.

This blog post with a Beginner’s Guide on How to Embroider Holly will help you with this design. It discusses the correct slant of the stitches and different shades of thread to use for the most realistic image.

I’ve also made it into a PDF format, the link is below, but a PDF file size can’t be changed or the design altered.

Briggs Embroidery Birds and Holly

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

If you’d like to see more embroidery designs I’ve blogged about previously, these are a couple of the most popular:

Lily of the Valley

Owl Embroidery Design or Coloring Page

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Free Vintage Embroidery Pattern for Hand Stitching

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

Today’s embroidery image is taken from a Godey’s or Peterson’s Ladies Magazine. The magazine is most likely from the 1800’s. It was a loose sheet so I don’t have the exact date of the pattern.

Antique Floral Embroidery Pattern for Edging - Vintage Crafts and More

The page states, “Embroidery for Infant’s Robe”. There are several stitches you could use to fill the pretty petite flowers, leaves and dots; lazy daisy, satin stitch and french knots to name a few. This earlier post has a how-to page of embroidery stitches included.

By right clicking on the image you can choose to “Save Image As” or click on the image, it will open in a new window to print or save for later.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns. Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

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Cross Stitch Flower Border Pattern Charts

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS (Vintage Textile and Needlework Sellers) Fan Freebie!

This is another pretty cross stitch chart from Thérèse de Dillmont. These particular patterns come from a DMC Library Cross Stitch New Designs 6th Series booklet (Bibliothéque DMC Point De Croix Nouveaux Dessins 6me Série) by TH. DE Dillmont.

It contains several different types of borders, wide, thin, and all over motifs plus designs of people. Some of the designs include three couples in national costumes, farmers, bakers and circus scenes including jugglers, acrobats and clowns.

Cross Stitch Flower Border - Vintage Crafts and MoresTo save these designs, simply click on the image above. It will open in a new window and there you can use the right click menu to “save image as” or print using your computer’s options. You can also use the green print friendly button at the bottom of this post.

I shared a chart of bunnies from one of her other booklets back in February. If you like this post, be sure to visit our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.

Silk Embroidery Flower Pattern Lovely 1800s Lily of the Valley

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Welcome to this Friday’s VTNS Fan Freebie!

lily of the valley embroidery pattern vintage crafts and more

 

I’m sharing an old but very pretty embroidery design for the flower, Lily of the Valley. It’s suggested to use silk floss and to embroider it on a baby shirt or blanket, but it would also be pretty on a table topper or blouse.

The birth flower of May (little early on this one). In the Victorian language of flowers, lily of the valley meant “return of happiness.”  It also symbolizes purity and sweetness.

 

 
When this was printed in the Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine, silk flosses had a beautiful high sheen that enhanced any project. You can still find some antique silk floss to buy on the internet. Many of the embroidery threads today are made of a silk rayon rather than 100% silk, making them more affordable but still giving a pretty sheen to your embroidery work compared to cotton floss.

From the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s there was an era of embroidery called “Silk Art” or “Society Silk” embroidery. This style of embroidery, much like needlepainting, was done mainly as florals on linen using fine silks. Donna Cardwell has written a book, Silk Art Embroidery: A Woman’s History of Ornament and Empowerment, that contains an interesting history as-well-as information on technique. A great source if you collect Victorian era hand embroidered linens.

 

Lily of the Valley Embroidery Pattern - Vintage Crafts and More

By right clicking on the image you can choose to “Save Image As” or click on the image, it will open in a new window to print or save for later.

Find similar embroidery patterns to this one in my ebook of designs from 1859 Ladies Peterson’s Magazines. You can find the information on it here.

If you like this page, be sure to share it with your friends and like our Facebook Fanpage so you can get updates every time we post new patterns. Please share your favorite needlework hints, tips and projects in the comments below or with us on Facebook.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy.