Armenian Edging Stitch Instructions from a 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine

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The article on the Armenian Edging Stitch in the 1925 Star Needlework Journal Magazine is titled One Makes This Lace With a Sewing Needle. There are instructions for three different designs. All of them start with a loop stitch across the material. Then by adding additional stitches you can build a pretty lace edge.

 

Armenian Edging Stitch Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle - Vintage Crafts and More

The instructions use a very fine crochet cotton to sew the edgings. A size 50 or 60 in white. Crochet cotton thread is sized by weight with each weight identified by a number. The lower the size number the thicker it is. The higher the crochet cotton’s weight number the finer the thread. So a Size 3 is heavier than a Size 10.

Armenian Edge Stitch - Vintage Crafts and More

Let’s Learn the Armenian Edging Stitch

Now you could try your hand at making an Armenian Edge Stitch following the directions above or I’ve found several blog tutorials and a YouTube video series that will help you master this stitch.

First of all, on the Artyfibres blog Sarah Whittle demonstrates stitches with step-by-step pictured tutorials. In her Stitch A-Z group she has a tutorial on the Armenian Edging Stitch. It’s very easy to follow as each pictured step has a number for your needle to follow.

Another well done tutorial is on the embroidery blog Kimberly Ouimet. She calls the Armenian Edge Stitch a Knot Stitch Edging and states that it is also known as Antwerp Stitch Edging.

Either way, it’s a good tutorial on this edging stitch. Her stitch looks very similar to a Blanket Stitch since she goes a little higher on the edge of the material. But again a very good tutorial with many pictures to break down each step in the stitch.

Last but not least is The Henry Art Gallery Embroidery Stitch Identification Guide.  There’s a diagram of the Armenian Edge Stitch as-well-as an Antwerp Edge. If you need to find a stitch this is a great site because all you have to do is click on the alphabetical Index of stitches.

The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work

This YouTube series has 8 parts on How to do Needle Lace, The Lost Art of Armenian Needle Work. It’s really beautiful and it helps to see someone actually doing it.

In the comments the instructor, Ashley says there are very few if any books or patterns for this type of lace. She hopes that by doing these videos she encourages people to learn so there will be a renewed interest in this craft. If the comments on the videos are any indication, I’d say she is succeeding.

Scanned One Page PDF File

Armenian Edging Stitch – Making Lace Edging with a Sewing Needle

The pattern is in PDF format so to read it you’ll need the Adobe Reader software on your computer. Most computers come with it, but it is free and can be found here.

Download Instructions: Right-Click the link and select either “save target as” or “save link as” depending on what browser you are using or simply click on it and save or print.

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Enjoy!

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2 comments

  1. Kristin says:

    Just beautiful. Beautiful! I am so grateful this woman took time out to show us this art and how to do it. She does a very good job of it. I think we will see a more of these type of arts being done by more people in the coming future, people (at least I hope) are getting disenchanted with all the digital stuff like phone games, computer games, realizing the digital stuff is just a waste of one’s time and years. I know a person close to me who has spent all of his free time in the last 7 years playing computer games, with nothing to show for it.

    • Debra says:

      Thank you for the comment Kristin. I’m with you, I think there’s been a surge in people discovering the old ways of doing things with their hands. From what I’ve read, there’s a renewed interest in arts and crafts. I love all the new technology and the things you can do with it but balance is the key. I find myself more and more wanting to unplug from all my gadgets. You are so right.

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